Take the 2-minute tour ×
Super User is a question and answer site for computer enthusiasts and power users. It's 100% free, no registration required.

My laptop is shows "SMART Failure predicted on Hard Disk 0: SAMSUNG HM640JJ" error on boot with windows 7 OS.

While surfing, I get a response as my HDD is running out. So get backup files as quickly. I did this.

May I know reasons, why this happens to my HDD?

Is it because of my usage or happens to HDD as manufacture problems?

If I replace my HDD with new HDD, how I can avoid new HDD with similar problem in future?

Is there any case SMART Analysis will be wrong?

How we can manually test with SMART in HDD and detect why test fails with full details?

share|improve this question

migrated from serverfault.com Apr 1 '13 at 1:03

This question came from our site for professional system and network administrators.

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

May I know reasons, why this happens to my HDD?

Every device that has moving parts will eventually fail. That includes hard drives. Physical fatigue, manufacturing "faults" (might be within tolerance, but still marginal), abuse (dropped during shipping), etc., can all shorten the lifespan of devices that have moving parts.

Is it because of my usage or happens to HDD as manufacture problems?

Could be either. If you replace this one with a new one, and you see the same problem, look at your usage.

If I replace my HDD with new HDD, how I can avoid new HDD with similar problem in future?

There's no way to say unless you know specifically what the problem actually is. If it's a manufacturing defect, you might be able to avoid it by switching to a different manufacturer's drives. But you might just as easily be trading one set of problems for another. Sysadmins are known to avoid some particular models from otherwise good manufacturers.

Every purchase is a gamble. If you want better odds, do some research before you buy a replacement drive. Get the best you can afford. Monitor it for errors. Replace it before it stops working.

Is there any case SMART Analysis will be wrong?

Probably. Do you want to bet all your data on that?

How we can manually test with SMART in HDD and detect why test fails with full details?

Most drive manufacturers have software you can use to test their drives. Check Samsung's web site for tech support, and see if there's a disk utility for your drive. Be warned that the tests that give you the most details might be destructive; they might be designed to overwrite everything on your disk.

share|improve this answer
2  
It may be worthwhile noting that (at least in my jurisdiction), the distributors of WD and Seagate hard drive will accept SMARTS advice that it is failing as adequate evidence the drive should be replaced (under warranty if still in the warranty period). –  davidgo Apr 1 '13 at 3:02
    
What will be usage problems causing the hard disk failure? I think, like 'continuous using', 'blocking the airflow of cooling pad fans in laptops' etc –  Justin John Apr 1 '13 at 16:50
    
@JustinJohn: I was thinking more along the lines of regularly knocking it off the table, or leaving it unpadded in a backpack that 30 people step on as they get on the bus. But, sure, blocking airflow and watching video that's saved to disk might fall under suboptimal usage. But the real point is that, if you have to keep replacing disk drives every few months, your real problem probably isn't disk drives. –  Mike Sherrill 'Cat Recall' Apr 1 '13 at 17:03

Some default value could no more be reached...

Like spinup time, one of the mostly experienced (by myself) reason: the time needed for the motor to put rotation speed from 0 to normal (workable) speed.

While motor become old, the time needed to boot the disk grow before the motor won't work anymore... This is a predictable failure

High cost HDD do work with strong motors.

Low-cost HDD suitable for video use lighter motors; While for viewing a video, you only need to make the drive start and work quietly, regulary until the end of you video stream.

share|improve this answer
    
The number of sectors that had to be reallocated is also a predictable failure if it reaches a threshold. –  Ramhound Apr 1 '13 at 11:06

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.