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In Word, how can we make bold text (such as by pressing Ctrl+B/the B button) use the bold variant of a differently named font from that of the non-bold font?

We're using the Light weight of the Open Sans font. Marking some text as bold makes Microsoft Word use what looks like a synthetic automatically boldified version of the Light weight, rather than the Bold weight. How can we make it use the actual Bold weight?

Open Sans comes in lots of weights; we have them all installed.

However in Word the Light weight shows up as a distinct typeface called ‘Open Sans Light’. The typeface called ‘Open Sans’ just has the Regular and Bold weights.

Obviously the font showing up as ‘Open Sans Light’ doesn't have a bold weight. How can we tell Word that when it's emboldening something in Open Sans Light it should use the Bold weight from Open Sans?

Alternatively, is there a way of installing a duplicate of Open Sans Bold as Open Sans Light Bold, such that Word will find it and automatically do the right thing?

We want to set up a template document such that all users in the organization can easily follow the house style and get the right fonts in all our documents, without them needing to know anything about how that's implemented. Thanks.

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Wouldn't 'Open Sans' be the bolder form of 'Open Sans Light'? (seeing as 'Open Sans Bold' is the bolder form of 'Open Sans'.) –  Andi Mohr Apr 4 '13 at 17:07
1  
@AndiMohr: Certainly Regular is bolder than Light, so those two might work well together. I happen to want the contrast between Light and Bold in this document. But the question is basically the same either way. –  Smylers Apr 4 '13 at 21:09

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted
+50

Rather than implement a macro/macros in Word (as prior answers have suggested) you can create duplicate copies of the Bold and Bold/Italic versions of 'Open Sans' and edit them such that they become part of the 'Open Sans Light' family.

Basically, you just:

  1. Create new copies of the Open Sans Bold and Open Sans Bold Italic font files, naming the filename appropriately.
  2. Edit the new font file(s) using (for example) typograf, to change the font family and font name to be correct for 'Open Sans Light'.

Now distribute/install the new font variants in the same way as you would with any other font file, and Word (and any other application) will now see them correctly.

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This isn't too difficult - set the font for the Strong style to Open Sans Bold.

See the screengrabs below showing the same thing with Eras Light/Eras Bold.

Style Menu

Set Strong Style

To apply this to all instances of bold text automatically without your users needing to specify the Strong style or manually run a find and replace, consider macro-enabling the file (save as .docm) and adding the following code to ThisWorkbook area in the Visual Basic Editor (press Alt+F11 to access the VBE).

Private Sub Document_Close()
   Selection.Find.ClearFormatting
   Selection.Find.Font.Bold = True
   Selection.Find.Replacement.ClearFormatting
   Selection.Find.Replacement.Style = ActiveDocument.Styles("Strong")
   With Selection.Find
      .Text = ""
      .Replacement.Text = ""
      .Forward = True
      .Wrap = wdFindContinue
      .Format = True
      .MatchCase = False
      .MatchWholeWord = False
      .MatchWildcards = False
      .MatchSoundsLike = False
      .MatchAllWordForms = False
   End With
   Selection.Find.Execute Replace:=wdReplaceAll
End Sub

This will run the find and replace when your users save and quit.

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Thanks. I'll give that a go tomorrow. –  Smylers Apr 4 '13 at 21:12
    
I haven't been able to get that to work. After redefining the Strong style, pressing Ctrl+B (or clicking the B icon) still uses the synthetic bold. Any idea what I could be doing wrong? (Explicitly using the Strong style does of course use the desired font.) –  Smylers Apr 8 '13 at 13:22
    
Sorry yes, good point. See also swref's answer here: superuser.com/questions/45670/auto-applying-a-style-in-word. Doesn't auto-apply the format I'm afraid, but makes it easy to update all instances of bold formatting. –  Andi Mohr Apr 8 '13 at 16:36
    
Unfortunately I don't think it's realistic to expect all our users to have to run a ‘fix up bold’ step whenever they finish editing a document. –  Smylers Apr 9 '13 at 15:20
    
Ah ok sorry that won't work then. Didn't realise this was for wider distribution. –  Andi Mohr Apr 10 '13 at 9:24

Create the following macro:

Sub ChangeBold()  
  If Selection.Font.bold = False Then
    If Selection.Font.Name = "Open Sans Light" Then
      Selection.Font.Name = "Open Sans"
      Selection.Font.bold = wdToggle
    Else
      Selection.Font.bold = wdToggle
    End If
  Else
    If Selection.Font.Name = "Open Sans" Then
      Selection.Font.Name = "Open Sans Light"
      Selection.Font.bold = wdToggle
    Else
      Selection.Font.bold = wdToggle
    End If
  End If
End Sub

Now change the keyboard shortcut Ctrl + B:

  1. click the File tab
  2. click Options
  3. click the Customize Ribbon tab
  4. in the Customize the Ribbon and keyboard shortcuts pane, click Customize
  5. in the Save changes in box, select Normal to save it to the standard template
  6. in the Categories box, click Start
  7. in the Commands box, click Bold
  8. click on Ctrl+B in the Current keys box
  9. click on Remove
  10. in the Categories box, click Macros
  11. in the Macros box, click the macro that you created (ChangeBold)
  12. in the Press new shortcut key box, type Ctrl+B
  13. in the Save changes in box, select Normal to save it to the standard template
  14. click on Assign

You can't replace the function of the B icon, but you can add the macro to the ribbon menu:

  1. right click the ribbon and select Customize the ribbon
  2. select Macros in the Choose command from drop down list
  3. select Home in the right side tree view and click New Group
  4. rename New Group to Custom Macros using the Rename button
  5. drag the macro item into the new group
  6. rename the new macro button
  7. click OK to save the changes
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for that. Unfortunately I think that it only works for Ctrl+B and only for already-typed text would be more awkward for our users to remember than ‘don't use bold; use the “Strong” style instead’. –  Smylers Apr 9 '13 at 15:21
    
@Smylers you could as well remove the B from the ribbon and replace it with the macro. Change the macro in a way, that it changes as well the used font. Like that it works as well for unwritten text. If you go this way, you would have to make as well a macro to "unbold" the text. –  Simon Apr 9 '13 at 15:36
    
@Smylers I changed my answer to fit your needs. I hope it helps! –  Simon Apr 11 '13 at 7:30

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