Take the 2-minute tour ×
Super User is a question and answer site for computer enthusiasts and power users. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I recently took my laptop to get cleaned and I saved the output of the command lshw to make sure the hardware was not changed. After I got it back, I ran the lshw command again and did a diff, and I found out there's a difference between the CPU's capacity. Before it was 1GHz and now it became 800MHz. Should I be worried? There is no serial number for Intel's processor anymore, therefore I can't tell whether it was changed or not.

Here is the output of lshw before the clean up:

*-cpu

description: CPU
product: Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-2820QM CPU @ 2.30GHz
vendor: Intel Corp.
physical id: 4
bus info: cpu@0
version: Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-2820QM CPU @ 2.30GHz
serial: N/A
slot: N/A
 size: 1GHz
 capacity: 1GHz
width: 64 bits
clock: 100MHz
capabilities: fpu fpu_exception wp vme de pse tsc msr pae mce cx8 apic sep mtrr pge mca cmov pat pse36 clflush dts acpi mmx fxsr sse sse2 ss ht tm pbe syscall nx rdtscp x86-64 constant_tsc arch_perfmon pebs bts rep_good nopl xtopology nonstop_tsc aperfmperf pni pclmulqdq dtes64 monitor ds_cpl vmx smx est tm2 ssse3 cx16 xtpr pdcm pcid sse4_1 sse4_2 x2apic popcnt tsc_deadline_timer aes xsave avx lahf_lm ida arat epb xsaveopt pln pts dtherm tpr_shadow vnmi flexpriority ept vpid cpufreq
configuration: cores=4 enabledcores=4 threads=8

And here's the output after the clean up:

*-cpu
description: CPU
product: Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-2820QM CPU @ 2.30GHz
vendor: Intel Corp.
physical id: 4
bus info: cpu@0
version: Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-2820QM CPU @ 2.30GHz
serial: N/A
slot: N/A
 size: 800MHz
 capacity: 800MHz
width: 64 bits
clock: 100MHz
capabilities: fpu fpu_exception wp vme de pse tsc msr pae mce cx8 apic sep mtrr pge mca cmov pat pse36 clflush dts acpi mmx fxsr sse sse2 ss ht tm pbe syscall nx rdtscp x86-64 constant_tsc arch_perfmon pebs bts rep_good nopl xtopology nonstop_tsc aperfmperf pni pclmulqdq dtes64 monitor ds_cpl vmx smx est tm2 ssse3 cx16 xtpr pdcm pcid sse4_1 sse4_2 x2apic popcnt tsc_deadline_timer aes xsave avx lahf_lm ida arat epb xsaveopt pln pts dtherm tpr_shadow vnmi flexpriority ept vpid cpufreq
configuration: cores=4 enabledcores=4 threads=8
share|improve this question

migrated from stackoverflow.com Apr 9 '13 at 18:01

This question came from our site for professional and enthusiast programmers.

    
Sounds like you... got taken to the cleaners. –  Joe Frambach Apr 9 '13 at 16:29
    
You would need to post the full output of lshw before and after. However, as noted by the 'close' votes, this really isn't the right site for this. Probably SuperUser. –  Novelocrat Apr 9 '13 at 17:59
    
Thank you! I added the output, I hope it helps. –  user1780104 Apr 9 '13 at 21:17
    
What model of laptop? If it has a socketed CPU, then what almost certainly happened is that the "professional" to whom you took it swapped your 1GHz CPU with a slower, cheaper part, most likely with the intention of reselling the one they stole -- not that that last part matters, if you can prove they stole the part. It might be worth your time to call the "cleaner" and discuss the matter; knowing that you can prove what they did -- and that your next call, should they fail to satisfy will be to your local law enforcement agency -- might convince them to give you your part back. –  Aaron Miller Apr 9 '13 at 22:12
    
The CPU model is the same, I wonder if its getting downthrottled –  Journeyman Geek Apr 9 '13 at 23:04

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Solved!

I ran the "yes | yes | yes | yes" command on a terminal for about a minute and I ran lshw in a different terminal and got the 1GHz back. I ran "yes | yes | yes | yes" on 2 different terminals at the same time, and did lshw and got 2.3GHz. Therefore I concluded that this value scales with CPU utilization and it's not fixed.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.