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Since some time I am unable to create file/folder on root. I always log in as root and was able to work properly.

My experience is as follows:

# pwd
/root

# mkdir xcxcx
mkdir: cannot create directory `xcxcx': No space left on device

# df -h
Filesystem      Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/sda1        41G  4.1G   35G  11% /
/dev/sda3        91G   36G   51G  42% /home
/dev/sda2        99G  3.4G   91G   4% /usr

I see ample space on my system; so why am I not able to create folder/files?

Update:

df -i

reports

Filesystem   Inodes    IUsed    IFree IUse% Mounted on
/dev/sda1   2681728  2681728        0  100% /
/dev/sda3   6037504   111043  5926461    2% /home
/dev/sda2   6553600   146034  6407566    3% /usr

Have I run out of inodes? If so, then how do I correct it?

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Unrelated to the issue, but why do you log in as root to work? As far as the problem goes, what do you get with a df -i? –  MaQleod Apr 12 '13 at 6:29
    
df -i Filesystem Inodes IUsed IFree IUse% Mounted on /dev/sda1 2681728 2681728 0 100% / /dev/sda3 6037504 111043 5926461 2% /home /dev/sda2 6553600 146034 6407566 3% /usr Have I run out of inodes? If yes then how to correct it? –  RupeshKumar Prasad Apr 12 '13 at 6:36

1 Answer 1

This is your problem:

/dev/sda1 2681728 2681728 0 100% /

You have no inodes free. You will need to delete files to free up inodes if you would like to write anything more on that file system. There is no way to increase the number of inodes once the file system has been created.

You should still be able to write to /home and /usr though.

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yes that IUse is 100%. But since space usage is just 11% how to decide which files to delete? –  RupeshKumar Prasad Apr 12 '13 at 6:43
    
That unfortunately is something only you can decide. Anything that you have written there and no longer need would be the best place to start. The thing about the root partition is that it is not meant to be used as a home directory. You really shouldn't be writing to it for day to day work. –  MaQleod Apr 12 '13 at 6:45
    
I will take care of this in future. Thanks a lot MaQleod for your suggestion. Meanwhile let me check how to come out of this issue. –  RupeshKumar Prasad Apr 12 '13 at 6:48
    
After moving many files from root to /usr I am able to create files/folders. But IUse% is still at 100%. How to reduce it? –  RupeshKumar Prasad Apr 12 '13 at 7:20
    
Is /usr on its own filesystem (it should be. Usually /, /tmp, /var and /usr have their own partitions). However if /usr is on the same fielsyem as / then you just moved things around on the same inode space. –  Hennes Apr 12 '13 at 9:01

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