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Recently I have had Windows 7 re-installed on my laptop. Now the layout of partitions and volumes

=============Primary=======================================
Partition0\system reserved: size 100Mb
Partition1\VolumeC: [NTFS, size 60Gb] - Windows System
Partition2\VolumeD: [NTFS, size 39Gb] - (empty)

=============Extended======================================
Partition3\Logical VolumeE: [NTFS, size 100GB] - Programs
Partition3\Logical VolumeF: [NTFS, size 100GB] - Files

As you might know that I'd reserved Partition2 for Linux Ubuntu 12.04.

My question is: would it be just so easy to boot system with Ubuntu 12.04 CD to install on Partition2? Do I have to install grub on Partition2 as well for dual boot?

Note that I'd like Windows loader in MBR. I can foresee that I need to run bcdedit in Windows 7 to add entry for Ubuntu. But I might miss something I don't know.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If you install boot system on your second drive or other than first drive ( that windows's boot is ) your system will boot with your windows boot and you could easily add the ubuntu to your boot menu with EasyBCD .

I'm afraid that If you want to install ubuntu on your second partition you have to change it's format to ext4 and windows doesn't recognize this format and maybe you can not access the partitions after second partition (third or fourth or ... ) in Windows.

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Hmm...but why does file system of the second primary partition do with that of the third or fourth? May I just leave them there? –  Yang Apr 13 '13 at 4:58
    
yeah, I think they would be fine. I'm just not sure :|. even you did it and cant access the third or fourth partitions, you can bring them back . don't be afraid :) . –  hamed Apr 13 '13 at 7:13

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