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I have a asp.net local website in C# (ISS 7).

In order for my client to test it, I would need him to access my machine through the internet.

How can I do it? There must be an easy way.

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migrated from stackoverflow.com Apr 19 '13 at 10:32

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2 Answers 2

The easy way.

Your computer have been connected with the internet and have get an IP. Find your ip using a page from the internet like this one http://www.whatsmyip.org/

Now you give that ip to your client and tell him to use it on the url (eg http://xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx/)


Now from your part, you must

  1. Setup IIS to allow to get connections no matter what is the name on the url
  2. Setup your router to allow to redirect all the income connection to your computer with the iis
  3. Disable the firewall for the income calls on port 80.
  4. Correct setup your iss to been able to run your site.
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+1. This is the best way. Plus, it's easy. –  DeeMac Apr 19 '13 at 9:30
    
Aristos - in effect, couldn't you just use this method to host your own site? As opposed to paying a professional hosting service? Couldn't you just purchase yourdomain.co.uk and then route this domain to your local computer? –  DeeMac Apr 19 '13 at 9:31
    
Thanks for the clear answer! –  dyesdyes Apr 19 '13 at 9:37
1  
@DeeMac Its an idea, but I do not follow it because you need a good computer that works 24/7 with UPS, professional hard disk that work 24/7, line that never down, and many more little things that is critical. To rend few space for web hosting is not so expensive and you do not to worry for many things. Anyway you can try it :). I must tell you that there are professional equipments that are able to run 24/7 without issues. The regular computers on the market are fail after 24/7 work for a year or two (from my experience). With other words, the cost is higher than rend one. –  Aristos Apr 19 '13 at 10:00
    
@DeeMac Also, review your ISP contract. This is generally not allowed per your contract with your ISP. They aren't going to say anything if you're just hosting a site for a few people to visit but if you ever got any real traffic they'd shut you down (at least mine would; it's happened a few times to people I know, they send a nasty letter to you as well). –  krowe Sep 8 at 17:13

Teamviewer http://www.teamviewer.com/en/index.aspx This will allow him to give access to your machine,

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To actually make this work, you must also setup and the router to accept connection and the firewall to permit them. –  Aristos Apr 19 '13 at 9:12
    
Obviously, this is dependant on how good your/your clients internet speed is as to how it performs. However, this way gives you a lot more control and allows you to see what your client is doing, so you can give a step by step in the teamview IM –  Philip Gullick Apr 19 '13 at 9:13
    
The negative on that is that you make your client to install a program, you potential open him a security hole because the teamviewer is stay on their computer as hidden service that is not stop, and from there is always run (potential slow your clients computer). Also you show to your client your work space - and what if you have 3 monitors, and your client a small screen ? Bad idea in general IMPO. By the way, is not free for pro use. –  Aristos Apr 19 '13 at 9:15
    
Teamviewer is not a hidden service, it can be stopped at anytime during sessions, and sessions can only be opened by two users connecting with passwords. Client can simply delete after, and the monitor point is invalid. This way maybe a littler slower dependant on connection strength but offers better security for both users. –  Philip Gullick Apr 19 '13 at 9:19
    
Clearly not much with Teamviewer, not bigging it up, just giving him the easiest way which at the same time offers security measures. –  Philip Gullick Apr 19 '13 at 9:24

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