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For a twelve month period a small area of approximately 800 square feet need internet access with a wireless AP (least important), and a router with a few 10/100 ethernet connections.

The building which houses this space is only wired for [a certain provider's] service which could be used, however I am lead to seek an answer here to this question due to what I consider a very unfair price for said provider's service (sticking it to the man?) and also since my network knowledge could use a refresh.

The considerations are: a) the building has many wifi networks that are within signal range of the 800sqft. space. From my research such networks could be used by obtaining a "bridge" device or using a router that has the capability to bridge (re. Dlink DAP-1522). Said device could once configured provide wired ethernet access. The speed and reliability of these networks in the building are unknown, and access to them would be accomplished by finding one owner willing to share access ($ is available to pay them in return).

b) 3g/4g is in the area. The following is how I assume one would use this inside a building: get a 4g modem device. This device would accept the sim card, and then provide Ethernet out just like a regular cable/dsl model does. The Ethernet out is then put to a router.

c) the price for the building's only network provider is $66usd + 15% tax per month. To connect initially the service there is a fee of $199. The downstream is 24mbps and upstream is *3*mbps.

d) the down/up speed for this space need only be sufficient to allow google voice calls, skype calls, and youtube streaming for two or three (at the most) computers. Thus the question is, which of these methods would be most sensible/economical given the conditions, or what other method exists for accomplishing this objective?

e) To clarify, this is not for business use but personal use so if for example, using 3g/4g is sometimes unreliable (I don't know this, but perhaps it is) then such is not a reason not to choose it.

f) an unlimited 4g plan is available in this area for 70$/mnth.

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If you're doing any kind of business go for option c - dont save pennies only to have horror scenarios catching up to you later on. –  M.Bennett Apr 21 '13 at 19:58
    
added information Re this; it's personal use –  jhstuckey Apr 21 '13 at 20:01
    
3g/4g is only good if you can either get unlimited data or use a tiny amount of data. Compared to option C a company like cricket only offers high speed data only hits 1.4mbs max and then only for the first 2gb/4gb/8gb depending on how much pay a month. –  cybernard Apr 21 '13 at 20:26
    
updated to include info about the 4g plans available in area; there are unlimited ones for 70$ a month. –  jhstuckey Apr 21 '13 at 20:31
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1 Answer

In option A: pay to share someone elses. Usually in the terms of service for ISP it says you can not resell their internet access. The owner may agree only to find themselves in violation of there ISP and get fined or disconnected.

Option B:  based on F this is more expensive for less speed and reliability
Option C:  For The Win
Option     DSL and then regret not getting option C
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Could you address how option B would be implemented? It might be more appealing to me on account of my not having to pay the company that provides f :) –  jhstuckey Apr 22 '13 at 15:22
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A company like "cricket" is the only place you might be able to get cheap 3g/4g. Otherwise option B and F put you in the same boat. The 3g/4g providers usually have some kind of USB stick or PCMCIA for laptop that you just plug in and setup. If you have a computer with at least XP on it you can activate windows internet connection sharing wizard. Then share it out your unused ethernet port to wherever you want. Including a wi-fi access point. –  cybernard Apr 22 '13 at 22:00
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