Take the 2-minute tour ×
Super User is a question and answer site for computer enthusiasts and power users. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I somehow encrypted some files without meaning to, and because of it I can't backup my user folder to Mozy. Is there a way to remove the encryption from all the files or at least find out which one are encrypted?

I'm runnin windows 7 ultimate 64bits

share|improve this question
add comment

6 Answers

This may be an older question; but I recently had the same need.

My goal was to be comprehensive (search all files) and not require additional software, so it uses the command prompt and any text editor.

Here is what I found as a workable solution:

  • open a cmd prompt
  • Enter the command: cipher /s:c:\ > encryption.txt
  • Open the file "encryption.txt"
    • To find encrypted folders, search for "will be encrypted"
    • To find encrypted files, search for "E" at the beginning of a line

Without parameters, Cipher lists state of the current directory and all files in it. The /s parameter tells it to recurse, and c:\ gives it the starting point. From there, "> ..." just redirects the output.

Cipher's output for encrypted files and folders look like this:

 Listing c:\Dev\Encrypted\
 New files added to this directory will be encrypted.

E Default.aspx
E Default.aspx.cs
E Default.aspx.designer.cs

Cipher's output for normal files and folders look like this:

 Listing c:\Dev\Plaintext\
 New files added to this directory will not be encrypted.

U Default.aspx
U Default.aspx.cs
U Default.aspx.designer.cs

Hope that helps.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 great answer - easily repeatable (CLI), no need to download any 3rd party apps and a persistent, searchable output –  AdamRalph Mar 13 '11 at 17:05
1  
Just tried this on Windows XP Pro, worked a treat, thanks. I used cipher /s:c:\ | find "E " not perfect, but worked for my use. –  Christopher Galpin Nov 9 '11 at 2:21
    
You can use cipher /u /n to list all encrypted files, on all drives. –  mivk Jan 18 '13 at 14:50
1  
Based on trying @ChristopherGalpin 's version of this answer (thanks!), I can suggest this one: cipher /S:. | findstr /b /c:"E" /c:" " > encryptedFiles.txt as slightly more accurate - it won't catch unencrypted files with names like E Marketing strategy, I wanted to see what directory they were in also - to make for easy removal - so it also includes the directory names - however it will include directories without encrypted files, so there is a little cruft still in the output. –  Chris O'Kelly Mar 28 '13 at 6:08
add comment

With Total Commander, you can do a search (ALT+F7) on various attributes of files and folders.

The "encrypted" attribute is one of them.

alt text

Once you have found all encrypted files and folders, select "Feed to listbox". It will put all names in the selected pane (left or right). There, you can select them all, right-click and select Properties. You'll get the Properties window for all the selected files. In the Advanced window, you can easily decrypt them by unchecking the "Encrypt..." checkbox.

alt text

share|improve this answer
add comment

You can type: encryptionstatus:encrypted Into the search field in an explorer window.

share|improve this answer
    
This might not the answer, I try to create an encrypted file. I dont know why in my Win7 the Encryption Status column does not show any value and so encryptionstatus:encrypted also simply shows nothing. answer from @Robert is the right way. found this file have 'E' at the begining of line. –  CallMeLaNN Jun 13 '11 at 5:22
add comment

You can use Windows Search Advanced Query. In search bar type: * is:encrypted. This command will find all encrypted files in folder.

share|improve this answer
add comment

cipher /u /n /h will find and list all encrypted files on your hard drives (as mivk commented on the other answer) without need for any additional filtering (that could go wrong). Credits for this also go to: http://www.sevenforums.com/tutorials/161226-encrypted-files-find-all-local-hard-drives.html where I found this answer.

As for unencrypting the files, Snark already answered that part. It can also be done by command line, again with the same tool: cipher /D ...

See the help for additional info and other uses: cipher /?

share|improve this answer
add comment

After trying Total Commander and having it fail for some inexplicable reason, I tried NirSoft's SearchMyFiles and it worked excellently. Lightweight standalone executable and the results don't have cruft to wade through like the cipher command; you can easily sort by folder path to know what listings are merely subdirectories of a parent encrypted folder.

SearchMyFiles

SearchMyFiles Search Options

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.