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The PCI cards happen to be different colours, so let's call them the black one and the green one. (i'm guessing the colour is just coincidence?!).

I have an old computer that takes the green PCI card pictured. It's a PCI dialup modem card. I've taken it out and photographed it as an example of what the computer takes.

I got a cheap old PCI card off ebay(PCI-USB) - the black one (I guess perhaps black is unusual too!)- but it doesn't fit.

What is the name of the specification of each of the two cards such that I can see what distinguishes them. What are they called.

I remember back in the day there being a 3.3V PCI, vs a 5V PCI, so for those i'd know ok one is called the 3.3V PCI and one is called the 5V PCI. No doubt things have changed since then. What's the difference between the two cards pictured in terms of for example what they're called?

I can see the black one has about 7 pins on the smaller section and the green one has about 11 pins on the smaller section

enter image description here

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Are you sure it doesn't fit? Since the small section is shorter, you might be able to fit it perfectly well just leaving some of the slot's pins unoccupied. I have no idea if that would work or not or if it would break anything mind. –  terdon Apr 28 '13 at 18:52
    
@terdon well, it's a screwless case, and the card didn't fit in snugly enough for me to pull the case's thing over the card to lock the card in place. So the card didn't fit in nicely in that sense. And when I tried to pull the card out it was very stiff I was a bit worried for the computer's pci slot. –  barlop Apr 28 '13 at 18:54
    
Just align the card properly. It should fit. Make sure that the bracket goes where it supposed to –  Alex P. Apr 28 '13 at 18:57
    
Looks like PCI express x16. Photos: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PCI_Express –  Ярослав Рахматуллин Apr 28 '13 at 19:13
    
@ЯрославРахматуллин please specify whether you're talking about the Black card or the Green card. –  barlop Apr 28 '13 at 19:24

1 Answer 1

If you check Wikipedia you will find this picture:

enter image description here Source

Both your cards have a single notch.
Both notches are on the opposite site of the PCI bracket.

This makes both cards 5 volt only, 32 bit PCI cards.

Looking at the pin layout the last set of pins are for power supply or indicating that this is a 64 bit card. These seem to be missing on your card. (Specifically: +5v, +5v, ACK,REQ 64, IOPower as show in the picture below). The black card might just get enough power from the pins on the opposite side of the card, though not connecting IOPOWER is confusing. It could work if the PCI bus is pulled up or down to the right setting, so the signal does not float. And not connecting it saves material and thus costs.

Part of the PCI connector pinout Part of the PCI connector pinout Source

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Both cards in his picture are regular 5V only PCI cards. –  Alex P. Apr 28 '13 at 18:55
    
@AlexP. they may be both 5V 32-bit PCI (and not PCI-E), but the black one doesn't seem very regular to me. How often have you seen a 5V 32-bit PCI card with such a small number of pins on the smaller section (7-pins) and how often have you seen a black PCI card 5V 32-bit? i've used lots of PCI cards. never black and with less pins on the smaller part. –  barlop Apr 28 '13 at 18:58
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"7pin" configuration is totally acceptable. It is missing some extra 5V lines. –  Alex P. Apr 28 '13 at 18:59
    
@AlexP. any links online for me to read about this? like article on it or people writing of using it, I googled for 7pin PCI, got nothing much. –  barlop Apr 28 '13 at 19:02
    
Will add that as a picture (already got it on screen) –  Hennes Apr 28 '13 at 19:03

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