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Somehow, I noticed since Sunday, I just cannot access SourceForge.net at all. Any idea what happened to the website?

That is true of pretty much all of their sites: freecode.net, slashdot.org...

I did not find other websites, so far, that do not work either. My computer does not even find the IP address as we can see dig saying timed out.

dig freecode.com

; <<>> DiG 9.8.1-P1 <<>> freecode.com
;; global options: +cmd
;; connection timed out; no servers could be reached

I would imagine that the DNS would still work even if they were to ban my IP address, and I don't really see why they would have done that anyway since I did not even access the site for a while?! I know that AT&T is upgrading their phone lines, but since I can still access pretty much everything else, I don't see why sourceforget.net would be the only mishap...

Any idea what I could to try to find why I cannot connect to them? Do you know of web proxies I could use to try accessing them?

Update:

I have a Win7 laptop too, and I can connect from the laptop no problem, full speed. So I suspect I have something on my Linux box that prevents me from connecting to some website. So I'm thinking that my Linux box has a routing that somehow goes in circle or fails in some way.

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Websites do not "ban" ip addresses. Its not an effective measure. There are better solutions that exist. Furthermore you would still be able to ping the website even if they had banned you. –  Ramhound May 1 '13 at 11:23

1 Answer 1

I'm answering my own question as I found it!

The /etc/resolv.conf is auto-generated and somehow it included 3 invalid/incorrect entries. Removing (commenting out) those entries resolved the issue. Not only that, it is a lot faster to browse all websites! Much better.

Now I'll need to find a reason why the auto-resolver adds 192.168.122.1 (I suppose that's because I run some virtual hosts once in a while, but it should remove that entry once I'm done with the virtual host!)

# Dynamic resolv.conf(5) file for glibc resolver(3) generated by resolvconf(8)
#     DO NOT EDIT THIS FILE BY HAND -- YOUR CHANGES WILL BE OVERWRITTEN
#nameserver 127.0.0.1
search m2osw.com
#nameserver 127.0.0.1
#nameserver 192.168.122.1
nameserver 206.13.31.12
nameserver 206.13.28.12

I suppose the 127.0.0.1 does not hurt, but I do not really need it either.

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1  
Actually you do. Thats what indicates the loopback address and allows you to vist your hosted website by going to the 127.0.0.1 address. Otherwise 127.0.0.1 would do nothing. Many applications assume loopback will work. –  Ramhound May 1 '13 at 11:24

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