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Is there a domain name which resolves something like "domain192-168-1-128" to the IP 192.168.1.128 ?

I am trying to test a site on my local network which uses "subdomains" (e.g. portal-admin.localhost) from a mobile device. E.g.

  • Machine "Server" hosts the web site "portal-admin.localhost"
  • Machine "Server" is with IP 192.168.1.128
  • I don't want to have to setup a DNS server on my LAN nor change '/etc/hosts' file

What I want is an external domain which provides this resolution service.

Thanks for any help.

share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Yes, there is a service like that: http://freedns.afraid.org/

You can login there and have free subdomains you can use for testing.

For example, right now i have "web.leet.la" pointing to "192.168.1.1".

And just for you there is "ts.leet.la" pointing to "192.168.1.128".

Feel free to do a DNS-lookup on it and use it as you need.

And if this is not what you're asking/looking for then the answer is No. An external service that literally maps 'portal-admin.localhost' or 'domain192-168-1-128' to '192.168.1.128' does not exist :-)

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Excellent! If I only get it to work... When, for example, I put "portal-admin.mooo.com" with an A record to "192.168.1.128", it seems this gets resolved to "127.0.0.2" which is clearly not what I want. – jldupont May 5 '13 at 14:32
    
On my end it's working! portal-admin.mooo.com points to 192.168.1.128. Always give it some time to refresh global DNS-caches and don't forget to flush your local DNS-cache! – XyZZy May 5 '13 at 14:40

Actually there is Xip.io which does exactly what you asked for: http://xip.io/

For example 192.168.1.128.xip.io resolves to 192.168.1.128.

share|improve this answer

Set the DNS in your "hosts" file on whatever computer you want to test from.

In Linux, it typically exists at "/etc/hosts".

In Windows, it typically exists at "C:\windows\system32\drivers\etc\hosts"

You could set it up with the following lines:

192.168.1.128       portal-admin.localhost
192.168.1.128       subdomain1.portal-admin.localhost
192.168.1.128       subdomain2.portal-admin.localhost

Alternatively, you could setup the proper "local" DNS entries on a domain you already own & manage,

localhost.somedomainname.com -> 127.0.0.1
*.localhost.somedomainname.com -> 127.0.0.1
internalnetwork.somedomainname.com -> 192.168.1.128
*.internalnetwork.somedomainname.com -> 192.168.1.128
share|improve this answer
    
that's not what I asked for. – jldupont May 5 '13 at 13:57
    
Edited my post for another option. I don't think anything like what you requested exists. – mattw May 5 '13 at 14:02

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