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I have a Dell laptop with 500GB hard disk and 64GB SSD.

I want to have a dual boot in it:

  • Windows 8 and Ubuntu 12.04 on the SSD
  • files and other stuff on the HD

Anyone could explain how to do so in the right, and easiest :), manner?

I have searched in internet but there are a mass of incomprehensible "tutorials".

Thank you very much for helping.

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migrated from stackoverflow.com May 15 '13 at 18:47

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@user9876 please do not tell people to post on other sites - this encourages people to double-post, which results in duplicates if the original is also migrated. Furthermore, in this case the question should not be moved in its present state, as it is overall low-quality. Before voting to migrate a question, you should ensure that it has been edited to meet quality standards. (For reference, I'm a moderator on SU. We get a lot of bad migrations.) –  nhinkle May 15 '13 at 17:58
    
So, are you wanting to have the Operating Systems on the SSD and all other general files (to be used by both OS's) on the HDD? –  Kevdog777 May 16 '13 at 9:57
    
yes, 2 OSs on the SSD and files and my stuff on the HD –  Gappa May 16 '13 at 12:33

1 Answer 1

If you are doing a fresh installation. The easiest way is to install Windows 8. And then you do your Ubuntu installation.

Ubuntu will then go ahead and install GRUB and picks up the fact that you have an existing windows installation, and then automatically prepare a grub entry for both Ubuntu and Windows 8. (Default boot to Ubuntu of course)

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I have Windows 8 installed and now I would like to install ubuntu. Are you saying that I don't need any partition of SSD and HD to do? –  Gappa May 16 '13 at 9:41

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