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I'm a DSL user and don't want to buy a router as I won't need it in a few months. I know it's possible to plug-in a DSL cable to your modem and get on the internet. I also know it's possible to share that connection with another computer using an Ethernet cable.

So here's my problem, one computer is using Windows Vista and mine is using Windows 7/Ubuntu 9.04. So how can I share the connection between these two computers.

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What network interfaces (RJ-45 NICs, WiFi, etc.) do you have on each of the computers? And which one will be used by the DSL connection? –  heavyd Jul 16 '09 at 18:51
    
DSL connect = modem. Sharing the connection between computer will be a single RJ-45 cable (dosen't matter if it needs to be crossover/straigh-through because I got both laying around and I think most newer laptops can use either to connect to another computer). –  Lucas McCoy Jul 16 '09 at 18:56
    
What connections are on the modem, other than the one for the DSL connection? Also how is the first computer currently connected? –  Brad Gilbert Jul 16 '09 at 19:11
    
Dial-Up modems don't generally work as DSL Modems. –  Brad Gilbert Jul 16 '09 at 19:17

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

To set up connection sharing between your two computers:

  1. Connect the two computers' RJ-45's with a cross-over Ethernet cable
  2. Open the network and sharing center, find your network connection, right click on it and go to properties
  3. In the "Advanced" tab, check the box to Allow other users to connect through this computer..
  4. Select the networks you would like to share with and you should be on your way.

I'm sorry if its not exact, I'm doing this from memory on an XP machine. I have setup connection sharing on my laptop over WiFi so I can connect to the internet on my iPod Touch through my laptop's EDGE network card. pretty nice

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Go buy a wireless router. A cheap Linksys/netgear will cost you $49. Even if you do not need it after a few months, you may find other uses. Almost all electronic devices now are comming out with WiFi. You might as well take advantage of it. Internet connection sharing on Windows is unreliable at best. At worst it is hours of frustration! Is your time and frustration worth the $49?

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1  
I would downvote you if I could. I like learning, paying $49 dollars isn't learning, it's giving up. –  Lucas McCoy Jul 16 '09 at 18:43
    
In addition to being cheap and simple, it adds an important layer of protection to your connection. I don't think I would ever want a machine connected directly to the bare internet. –  Mark Ransom Jul 16 '09 at 19:28
    
Lucas, this isn't about learning or not learning. ICS for Microsoft rarely works, let alone reliably. The performance gain that you will get is also worth $49! It's not giving up, it's doing what makes the most sense! –  Molex Jul 16 '09 at 19:34
  1. On the Windows 7 machine select Internet connection sharing for the Tata Photon Plus device. This set a IP of 192.168.137.1 for the ethernet port of the Windows 7 machine.

  2. Through the router configuration webpage (router'a built-in one) , set DHCP to on for the router, with a router IP of 192.168.1.100 and gateway and DNS as 192.168.137.1 (aka the Windows 7 machine).

  3. Connect the Linux machine to the router and let the router assign a IP by DHCP.

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Do you have firewire or another network interface on both ? You can't just plugin a switch between the DSL modem and the two computers. I would use the 1 Vista machine setup to have Internet Connection Sharing and the other two connect to it.

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I'm plugging the DSL into my moden on vista machine (eg. used to be used for dial-up) and then sharing with the ethernet cable on both PC's LAN ports. –  Lucas McCoy Jul 16 '09 at 18:15
    
And no unfortunately I don't have a switch, router, or dare I say it a hub. –  Lucas McCoy Jul 16 '09 at 18:16

protected by studiohack Apr 27 '11 at 1:23

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