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I have just started using Ubuntu with XFCE. I downloaded the latest version of the Android Developer Tools from Google, and now I'm trying to figure out where I can put it. On Windows, I'd just unzip it to my C drive and rename the root folder "adt", and be on my merry way. But I can't figure out where it would go on Linux.

  • Putting it in the root "/" folder doesn't seem like an option.
  • /usr/bin and /usr/local/bin look like they're disallowed.
  • I really don't want to keep this in my Download folder!
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Have you tried Android Studio? –  Andrea Gottardi May 21 '13 at 16:07
    
@AndreaGottardi It still leaves me with the "where does it go?" problem. But yeah, it looks cool :) –  user May 21 '13 at 16:09
    
can't you simply move it from Download to another folder you like? –  Andrea Gottardi May 21 '13 at 16:11
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Depends if it should be available only for you or for all users of the linux system. If it's for all users then /usr/local/bin (via sudo). If it's only for you, then something like /home/<myuser>/bin and then add it to the search path –  André Schild May 21 '13 at 16:14

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

On Ubuntu, just like on Windows, you can decide where you want to install/place applications, including the developer tools, and it is entirely up to you to keep your disk organized how you best see fit. Places like /usr/bin and /usr/local/bin tend to be protected, since changes there can have system-wide effects, but the protection is nominal

Personally, I like to keep my development tools separate, and restricted to a dev account on my machine, so I'd go with something like ~/devtools.

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Took your advice, made a folder ~/Programs to put my software in. Thank you. (And I just found out "~" turns into "/home/myusername/". –  user May 21 '13 at 16:21
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that sounds like a safe starting point. as you learn more, you'll want to put some things in other directories. check out the wikipedia article for a good primer on what the conventions are: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unix_directory_structure –  blueberryfields May 21 '13 at 16:31

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