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Not sure if such a query is relevant here but feedback would still be appreciated.

Some context first: Few months back I purchased MS Office 365 University for my new laptop (custom made). The licence was then installed successfully to the machine. Unfortunately in the last few weeks, I had issues with my laptop (unrelated to office) where the company I bought it from said that all they can really do to fix the fault was to replace all the parts in the machine (motherboard, hard drives, memory, the lot (it was a pretty bad fault)). The OS was removed also but I didn't mind as I had a technicians disk for windows 7 at the time. Anyway with the laptop returned OS and drivers setup a thought occurred to me which is my question:

Have I lost my 1st licence of office 365 as a result of the new build?

I have checked the licence terms of the product and it does seem that way in black and white but at the same time, I have read in an article somewhere that the licence on 365's are transferable by which I ask myself could this be the work around?

I would like to hear others opinions on this first before I start playing around with it. I don't really want to resort to using my last licence unless its my only option.

Thanks for reading

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Office 365 does not have a normal license it has a subscription. Your subscription is connected to the account in question. Just manage the account that purchase the rights to this software. –  Ramhound May 30 '13 at 16:07
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This site does not look highly upon opinions. I'd recommend editing the question to ask for our expertise –  Canadian Luke May 30 '13 at 23:00

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Office 365 Home Premium is not tied to a particular PC. You may transfer it.

Go to http://office.com/myaccount. Here you can deactivate and reinstall the software if necessary.

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"tied", but I guess "tight" also works in a roundabout sort of way. :) –  Karan May 31 '13 at 2:45

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