Take the 2-minute tour ×
Super User is a question and answer site for computer enthusiasts and power users. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a question that maybe pretty simple for those who are little more adept at this. Recently, I've been wanting to get the Ethernet ports around my house (which was built last year) live. I have a Comcast modem which connects to a wireless router.

After researching, I've found the Structured Network Panel in my master closet. I've also researched the various ways on getting those ports connected. My only question is this.

enter image description here

Why are only two wires each punched down for each punch down block thing? Shouldn't all the wires for each of the cables be punched down? I'm sorry if this sounds extremely beginner.

I have no use for the phone lines, so would it be easier to cut those ends, and then terminate them all with an RJ45 connecter? Then I could add a switch.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

Here are specs for the wiring in a Cat5 cable, with instructions on how to install them in the punchdown block (the instructions are essentially strip the wires, and punch them down as indicated by color. ) Yes, all 8 wires should be used. keep each pair together so put the orange-white cable next to the orange, green white next to green, etc.

http://www.ertyu.org/steven_nikkel/ethernetcables.html

share|improve this answer

For completeness' sake, like Frank says, all four pairs should be punched down. But, based on the experience of having done this myself, what you have here is a one-line telephone distribution module - thus you only need the first (blue) pair punched down, so the telecom guy saved himself (or herself, as the case may have been) some annoyance. I would, for the sake of future owners, leave the phone cables in place (perhaps going ahead and punching down the other three pairs if you're feeling generous) and simply add network cabling to your panel. Running said network cabling throughout your home may require more work, including removal and replacement of sheetrock, but it will make future owners ever so much happier to not have to replace your ethernet jacks with traditional phone jacks should they want actual phone jacks.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.