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I had a horrible problem with photoshop CS6 hanging on Windows 7. I ended up uninstalling like 500 fonts to fix the problem. Now some webpages do not look right, they are clearly using the wrong font. Seems likely Chrome or Windows is substituting another font for one it doesn't have. How I can tell what fonts it wants? I don't want to just add back hundreds of fonts because I suspect photoshop will break again, but if I knew which were needed I could probably add back a few dozen.

It would be ideal if there was a log like: "You did not have font X so we are using font Y." Then I could install X if I have it.

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open the web developer tools. All modern browsers have that, here you should see some warnings/errors. Maybe it shows you which font it requires. Also run sfc /scannow to detect missing buildin Windows fonts.

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Thanks for ideas. F12 dev console in Chrome shows no errors or warnings when I go to a page where I know it or windows is substituting a font. And sfc /scannow shows nothing. Some part of the system must be saying "He doesn't have font X so let me use font Y instead..." I just want to know what X is, seems like a reasonable question. –  Philip Jun 9 '13 at 1:14
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I found a partial answer. The Chrome extension WhatFont will tell you for a specific instance if a font was not found. See for example this screenshot where I was missing Verdana:

http://i.imgur.com/IEfwRL1.png

This isn't ideal because you have to realize a wrong font was displayed. Instead I would like a log of some kind so after a day or week of surfing around, I can see what fonts I'm missing. Anyone have way to find any and all fonts missing during regular surfing?

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