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I have a headless Raspberry Pi using Debian Wheezy.
I have a wifi dongle and if I connect my Raspberry using it, everything works fine: I can connect to the Internet, I can ping, I can update.

However, if I get down my wifi and set up the lan interface, I lost my internet connection.
I still can connect to it locally, using my laptop, but the connection doesn't exit (ie ping is not working).

Some useful info:

cat /etc/network/interfaces

auto lo
auto eth0

iface eth0 inet static
      address 192.168.0.105
      netmask 255.255.255.0
      gateway 192.168.0.1

ping www.google.com

(nothing request timed out)

ifconfig

eth0      Link encap:Ethernet  HWaddr b8:27:eb:a2:b5:20
          inet addr:192.168.0.105  Bcast:192.168.0.255  Mask:255.255.255.0
          UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST  MTU:1500  Metric:1
          RX packets:1130 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
          TX packets:1116 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
          collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000
          RX bytes:97223 (94.9 KiB)  TX bytes:146140 (142.7 KiB)

ping 192.168.0.1

PING 192.168.0.1 (192.168.0.1) 56(84) bytes of data.
^C
--- 192.168.0.1 ping statistics ---
19 packets transmitted, 0 received, 100% packet loss, time 18007ms

cat /etc/resolv.conf

nameserver 8.8.8.8

netstat -r

Kernel IP routing table
Destination     Gateway         Genmask         Flags   MSS Window  irtt Iface
default         192.168.0.1     0.0.0.0         UG        0 0          0 eth0
192.168.0.0     *               255.255.255.0   U         0 0          0 eth0

well, I think that's all... Any ideas?

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

The 100% packet loss, when you ping your router, is a concern. It indicates connectivity issues. This can be caused by a bad cable (try a different one), MAC filtering being enabled in your router, a bad Ethernet port in either your Pi or your router, a bad iptables config, or a number of other issues. Does anything else work using that router port and cable?

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I checked EVERYTHING and finally I found the reason: my electrician created TWO separated LAN without telling me. I was plugging the cable in the wrong plug. Now I know how to workaround on it (and do a little talk with my electrician...) – tampe125 Jul 5 '13 at 10:03

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