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Not sure if this is the right stack exchange to post this. If there is a better place please redirect me - thanks.

I enabled these lines in httpd.conf:

LoadModule proxy_module modules/mod_proxy.so
LoadModule proxy_connect_module modules/mod_proxy_connect.so
LoadModule proxy_http_module modules/mod_proxy_http.so

Then I added these lines:

ProxyRequests Off

<Proxy *>
    Order deny,allow
    Allow from all
</Proxy>

ProxyPass /goo http://google.ca
ProxyPassReverse /goo http://google.ca

If I open up my browser and go to this URL:

http://localhost/goo

I get redirected to:

http://www.google.ca

I expected that mod_proxy would act like a proxy and not just redirect to google. I would expect that my browser should NOT know that google.ca exists and should only know about the existance of the proxy server.

  1. What is going on here?
  2. Is this not what mod_proxy was designed for?
  3. Is there something else that I should be using instead?
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1 Answer 1

Have you tested the proxy with any other target? The redirect is likely to be happening on the Google side of the transaction. Can you also try redirecting the root of the domain (i.e. /) and see it that has any effect?

FWIW, have exactly the same ProxyPass configuration as you (though without Google), and I have requests being forwarded with no problems.

That said, if you can edit your post to include the full VirtualHost and Apache configuration, that may help clarify things.

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The rest of the configuration is the default apache configuration plus several aliases and script aliases. --- I tried pointing at several other sites (cbc.ca, several sites inside my intranet) but had the same result. –  sixtyfootersdude Jul 30 '13 at 22:46

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