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Meld has a command for Refresh and for Reload under the View menu. The help contents don't have anything useful in them, and I couldn't find anything on it when I googled it.

What is the difference between Reload and Refresh in Meld?

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I guess maybe like me, you're using an older version of meld from a package repository. In the latest releases, it appears that the "Reload" option has been removed. Here's an excerpt from the commit comment, which explains nicely the difference between the two:

For version control and folder comparisons, Reload and Refresh already did exactly the same thing. For file comparisons, Reload actually re-reads files off disk, discarding changes if there were any. Since this behaviour is closer to that of gedit's Revert, this commit removes the Reload action for all views, and adds a Revert command to the File menu for file comparisons.

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This is helpful, but I'm still a bit unsure of the differences. Why do reload and refresh do the same thing with version control and folder comparisons, but (presumably) not for file comparisons? It sounds like for file comparisons, reload actually re-reads the file from the disk, and refresh does something different... –  CodyPiersall Aug 9 '13 at 13:38
    
@CodyPiersall I think it's best to think of "reload" as a "revert", as in "discard any changes I've made within meld". In file mode, you may have made changes that can be reverted, but in vcs/folder mode, there isn't really any way it can "revert" anything. The "refresh" option would be used to pick up external changes to files. So effectively both of them re-read files from disk, but Reload also discards any local changes you have made. –  arcticmac Aug 14 '13 at 18:57
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