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I have a list in a txt like this

AAA 1234561
BBB12 66698732
CCCCC 5878471
DD131 262554158

and and I have a Directory like the below

DirectoryA/AAA
DirectoryA/BBB12
DirectoryA/CCCCC
DirectoryA/DD131

I want to create a txt file with a give name lets call it id.txt which contains the respective code for its folder

So the DirectoryA/AAA/id.txt contains 1234561
DirectoryA/BBB12/id.txt contains 66698732 and so on. 

I tried to extract the line with /p but it copies the whole line not just the ID.

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up vote 4 down vote accepted
for /f "tokens=1-2" %%A in (x.txt) do echo %%B > DirectoryA\%%A\id.txt

Discussion:

You can get a lot of useful information by typing FOR /? into a Command Prompt.  In particular,

FOR /F  ["options"]  %variable IN  (file-set)  DOcommand[command-parameters]

reads the file or files specified between the parentheses (the file-set) and parses each line out into tokens.  tokens=1-2 is the options string to say that you want the first and second words on each line.  %%A specifies that %%A is the variable that the first word will be read into; implicitly/automatically the second word goes into %%B.  Then the echo command gets executed with %%A and %%B set to the two words from the file.

Note: If you were typing this command directly into the Command Prompt, you would use %A and %B, but you have to use double percent signs when you do the same thing in a script (batch file).

share|improve this answer
    
Its working great can you please explain to me the tokens=1-2 and the whole thinking behind this command? thanks in advance – Sonamor Aug 16 '13 at 23:57
    
I hope I could rep you up Scott, thanks for the exlanation – Sonamor Aug 17 '13 at 0:23

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