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I'm working on a little util tool written in bash that gives me some information about a game server on Linux. For that reason I need a possibility to display the size of the file contents.

I'm doing that right now by using this:

du -Lshc *

It works almost perfect! The only flaw is that it displays stuff like this:

21G     backups
22G     server
8.0K    start.sh
151M    world.zip
43G     total

This is fine but I want more digits. Meaning it should look like that:

21.587G     backups
22.124G     server
8.089K      start.sh
151.198M    world.zip
43.436G     total

Is there a possiblility to do that?

I wouldn't mind using a complex command since I use it in a .sh file so I won't type it by hand every time.

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up vote 3 down vote accepted
du -Lsbc * | awk '
    function hr(bytes) {
        hum[1024**4]="TiB";
        hum[1024**3]="GiB";
        hum[1024**2]="MiB";
        hum[1024]="kiB";
        for (x = 1024**4; x >= 1024; x /= 1024) {
            if (bytes >= x) {
                return sprintf("%8.3f %s", bytes/x, hum[x]);
            }
        }
        return sprintf("%4d     B", bytes);
    }

    {
        print hr($1) "\t" $2
    }
'

awk-function based on this.

One could probably make the output look a bit nicer by piping it through column or left-padding it with spaces.

Edit: Added the left-padding.

Also, to sort the list: du -Lsbc * | sort -n | awk and then the awk-script.

share|improve this answer
    
This is almost perfect. It only has a little issue if the file size is 0. Then no number is displayed. Another thing is that there are decimal places if the unit is B (Meaning it looks like 108.000B. Which is some kind of akward.) But thank you anyways! – BrainStone Aug 18 '13 at 13:06

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