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I want to group my tabs by categories and then split them to different sessions(windows). For example, I can have one windows which contains all the tabs that are work related, and some other windows that are for news, everyday use, hobbies, entertainment, etc. So I can load these sessions/windows independently whenever I want. More importantly, I need the browser to be able to manage these sessions separately, for example, when I close one window(session), it should be able to autosave it without affecting any other sessions.

I think this requirement is quite simple. But somehow, neither firefox(with session manager add-on) nor opera support this.

so which browser actually supports this?

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similar question superuser.com/q/60931/103134 –  Santosh Kumar Apr 23 '12 at 16:24
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5 Answers

if you have a registered version of Sandboxie, this is fairly easy to achieve.

create multiple sandboxes (this is only possible with the registered version!)

now create firefox shortcuts and add the URLs you wish to open in the respective session.

right click the first shortcut > run sandboxed > pick the first sandbox.

right click the next shortcut > run sandbox > assign to the second sandbox.

and so on and so forth ... as a neat bonus this will add a decent layer of security. :)

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So tempted to buy sandboxie, the free one is pretty good regardless, but so many features! –  Phoshi Nov 15 '09 at 21:33
    
do, you won't regret it. multiple containers, force programs to start in sandboxie, lifetime upgrade plus you may install the program on any computer you own without buying additional licenses. –  Molly7244 Nov 15 '09 at 23:17
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On linux, run firefox -no-remote -ProfileManager. That will bring up a dialog box where you can manager multiple independent firefox profiles. Separate histories, bookmarks, add-ons, everything. I use this feature to maintain a "clean" profile that I can use to test broken websites, so I can see if one of my add-ons is breaking a problematic website.

I'm not sure exactly how to run firefox with that option in Windows, but you'll find it if you google.

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Can't run two SIMULTANEOUSLY. –  Hugo May 3 '10 at 3:06
    
Yes it can. You might need to use -no-remote as well. –  Ryan Thompson May 18 '10 at 2:10
    
Yes, it works, but there's no way (on Linux at least) to bring back all the sessions you were using last time automatically, next time you login. Desktop session management should do this, but it doesn't, due to this Firefox bug: bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=637624 –  Robin Green Apr 8 '11 at 22:36
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Chrome:

You could also have a look at Manage multiple users on Chrome feature

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Google Chrome supports multiple users. On the new tab page, on the upper-right corner, you can log in with two different Google accounts. That will create two different users, each with their own separate cookies (and thus logins). you can then pick a user and create a window using that users profile. The top-right of each window will then show an icon to indicate which user you are using. For more info, see http://support.google.com/chrome/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=2364824.

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A single instance of firefox will allow you to have multiple windows, however, if you need multiple instances of firefox use the no-remote switch.

For grouping tabs, there are a number of options. A couple you could take a look at are:

Categorize

Tab Kit

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