Take the 2-minute tour ×
Super User is a question and answer site for computer enthusiasts and power users. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have some sites which I log in to regularly that use HTTP authentication. I have the password saved in Firefox's password manager. How can I get Firefox to always use that password without prompting unless authentication fails?

Currently, when I open the browser I get a password prompt (its my home page). Even though the password dialog is already filled in, and I just have to press OK, it seems one click more than I need!

I am currently using the latest version of Firefox 23.0.1

Thanks for your suggestions.

share|improve this question
    
This is a bit of a strange workaround.. but try using an addon called Lastpass. Lastpass has the autofill (which you still need to click "login") and they also have Auto-login which is the feature that you are after. –  Darius Sep 3 '13 at 12:30
1  
which version of firefox do you use? I haven't had such an experience in firefox! –  emab Sep 3 '13 at 12:48
    
thanks - good point - updated the question –  nwaltham Sep 3 '13 at 12:49
    
Do you want the firefox to submit the password for you? –  emab Sep 3 '13 at 12:57
    
@emab Yes - that's right –  nwaltham Sep 3 '13 at 13:02

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

There is one add-on for that. install the add-on autoauth, that exists directly for that... i think that secure-login can also do that and have more feature, if you need then.

But please understand why firefox can't officially do that, it would open the door for abuse and allow one to steal the authentication via Cross-site scripting (XSS) and other tricks. A few users using it is probably safe, but there is always a risk.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Just tried autoauth and its working for me. Will have a look at secure-login too as that that looks interesting also. Your points re. security noted! –  nwaltham Sep 3 '13 at 13:58

The firefox is responsible for filling the password form, not submitting that filled form. It has severe security and logical risks. To understand this, imagine the following scenarios:

  1. a web site sets the same cookies as your own homepage, and requests the same password fields, then the firefox may get fool and send you private information (which is your password) to the fake homepage maker.

  2. suppose you have changed your password and not saved the new passwords in firefox, then whenever you want to enter you web site, the firefox automatically submits the wrong password and makes trouble for you.

there are other risky scenarios too.

share|improve this answer
1  
Except it is possible through the use of an add-on. –  Ramhound Sep 3 '13 at 15:00
1  
The first line is wrong, but the rest is correct.The security warning and the auth fail loop comments are still valid. Remove it and i will try to put the score back to zero (only who downvote can remove it) –  higuita Sep 3 '13 at 15:47

Lastpass is a really nice tool that really lets most of us keep our sanity since it frames HTTP requests in addition to storing your credentials like any password manager. Let me explain why you have to suffer through that "extra step".

Most of the times a "Remember Me" checkbox is all it takes to autologin into that website. Using this checkbox actually stores a cookie on your computer. This cookie is then used by the destination website to identify the user session and provide him with access. However some websites disable identification from the cookies stored on the computer forcing the user to provide access credentials for added security.

The firefox password manager is doing its job when it is populating your login details (that is its job). The fact that you have to press the button is to send the HTTP request (something the Firefox password manager, unlike Lastpass, cannot do).

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.