Take the 2-minute tour ×
Super User is a question and answer site for computer enthusiasts and power users. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I sometimes need to make changes to a .zip or .jar file, so I usually move the file to /tmp, extract all the files with unzip, edit a few files, and then re-zip up the files. This works, but it can be tedious. Is there a utility or shell script that I can use to edit a file inside of a zip file without explicitly calling unzip and zip (even if it's just a wrapper around these commands)?

share|improve this question
    
Just curious if the answer works on .jar files? (I didn't test it there.) –  beroe Sep 24 '13 at 2:31
    
@beroe It should since those use the zip compression algorithm. That was actually my main motivation for looking for a solution because I had .war files deployed on an app server that I didn't feel like re-packaing up and re-deploying just to modify a single file. –  austin Sep 24 '13 at 14:41
    
Great. I am going to try to fix the function so it preserves directory structure inside the archive. Currently I think it only works on files at root level, but for my purposes, subfolders are more useful. –  beroe Sep 24 '13 at 14:45
    
@beroe That's pretty cool. Before asking this, I was going to code up a python script for launching a psudo-shell "inside" the zip file to execute arbitrary commands. I'd be interested in what you come up with. –  austin Sep 24 '13 at 14:47
    
OK, added another solution to support sub-folders, and it works in limited testing. –  beroe Sep 24 '13 at 19:37
add comment

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Do you know the name of the file in the archive before unzipping it? You could make a function to unzip to /tmp, edit, and refresh the zip:

zipedit(){
    echo "Usage: zipedit archive.zip file.txt"
    unzip "$1" "$2" -d /tmp 
    vi /tmp/$2 && zip -j --update "$1"  "/tmp/$2" 
}

As it says, usage is:

zipedit myarchive.zip myfile.txt

This unpacks the named file from the archive, saves it to /tmp, edits it in vi then adds it back to the archive, while "junking" the path. Add to your .bash_profile, assuming bash...

EDIT: Below is a version which works with subfolders inside the archive... Note, do not use a slash before the name of the folder (i.e. use myfolder/file.txt not /myfolder/file.txt). If you edit a file that didn't already exist in the archive, it will create it for you. Also not sure if it will work with the absolute path to the zip file. Best stick with relative.

zipedit(){
    echo "Usage: zipedit archive.zip folder/file.txt"
    curdir=$(pwd)
    unzip "$1" "$2" -d /tmp 
    cd /tmp
    vi "$2" && zip --update "$curdir/$1"  "$2" 
    # remove this line to just keep overwriting files in /tmp
    rm -f "$2" # or remove -f if you want to confirm
    cd "$curdir"
}

Thanks for the question. I'll probably end up using this one too!

Another edit: Untested, but I read that vim and emacs will both edit jar files directly?

share|improve this answer
    
I can confirm that vim works splendid for editing zip-files from the command line on Linux, thanks alot for the tip! –  Thomas Bindzus Apr 24 at 18:08
add comment

Vim supports transparently editing files inside zip files. Just execute:

vim file.zip

and you will be shown a list of files inside zip archive. Choose the one you want to edit, change what you want, and exit with :x

share|improve this answer
    
By the way, default zip support in vim only allows editing one level ZIPs. If you need to edit ZIPs inside ZIPs, you should use this vim plugin. –  jesjimher May 14 at 8:27
add comment

Short answer: NO.

If it's a wrapper, you are calling these commands. Anyway, the best I can think of is to open the file using file-roller, if you are in an X environment, that might work with a simple double click, depending on your setup. You can then double click on the compressed file to open it and then you can edit it:

$ file-roller b3.zip 

When you save your edited file, you should get this dialog:

You could make a script for this also, but that gets complicated if you have compressed archives that contain multiple files. Let me know if that's what you need and I might be able to cook something up.

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
add comment

Short pedantic answer; no. If you think about compression, you're using redundancy to shorten the files inside, so any edit changes the whole file within the archive, possibly the archive.

If you're being less theoretical, more practical, more "I don't want to have to manually unzip/zip" there are tools that you can use. ark on Linux is one I've used. You could also mount the archive with fuse-zip, though that's probably more work than a temp file.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.