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I've read in MANY places that Windows 7 can only have 4 partitions (without resorting to creating an Extended Partition).

But when I try to create my 4 allowed, non-extended partitions... the 4th one instantly BECOMES part of an Extended Partition that I didn't want or need.

So isn't it far more accurate to say "Only 3 partitions are allowed, without using Extended Partions"?

Or did I do something wrong?

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When you created each partition, did you explicitly indicate that you wanted them to be primary partitions? –  John Bensin Sep 23 '13 at 0:07
    
are you using a windows installer to partition? it usually creates a small partition you didn't ask for, for storing boot files. –  Frank Thomas Sep 23 '13 at 0:10
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The 4 partitions limit is inherit to MBR, not the Windows 7. If you have newer computer with UEFI (or that HDD is not bootable) you should format your HDD to GPT and it allows to create up to 128 partitions (at the minimum configuration). –  eiennohito Sep 23 '13 at 2:49
    
@eiennohito post this as answer, please. –  magicandre1981 Sep 23 '13 at 4:07
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Your problem is inherent to whatever partitioning software you're using, not to the MBR partitioning system or Windows per se. Plenty of programs enable you to create four primary partitions on an MBR disk. –  Rod Smith Sep 23 '13 at 19:23

1 Answer 1

The 4 partitions limit is inherit to MBR, not to the Windows 7. If you have newer computer with UEFI (or that HDD is not bootable) you should format your HDD to GPT. It allows to create up to 128 partitions (at the minimum configuration). Additionally MBR doesn't allow to create partitions more than 2TB in size, so if you have 4TB HDD, GPT is your only option to allocate all the space to a single partition.

Windows can not boot from GPT-formatted disk if you have BIOS PC, but almost all modern motherboards have the UEFI.

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