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Thinking of buying a computer that comes with windows 8, but want to install Linux on it (Mint or Debian). I was wondering a few things:

  1. Do most computers with windows 8 come with UEFI now - eg, Samsung laptops?

  2. I heard that Microsoft may lock the UEFI so that other operating systems can't install. Is this the case?

I'm looking to do a clean install - so only have one operating system on the hard drive.

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marked as duplicate by James, Kevin Panko, MariusMatutiae, Nifle, Moses Nov 29 '13 at 23:21

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Where exactly did you hear that? I'm pretty sure the only Windows 8 machines that are locked to prevent other OS installs are the Surface RT's. –  Ƭᴇcʜιᴇ007 Sep 23 '13 at 17:11
    
Related: Dual/triple booting Surface Pro? –  Ƭᴇcʜιᴇ007 Sep 23 '13 at 17:14
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100% of OEM computers today depending on your region come with UEFI. Microsoft does not have control over UEFI. Their only requirement for a Windows 8 logo is that Secure Boot is enabled which is a feature of UEFI. There is nothing about UEFI that prevents you from installing Linux or any other operating system on your device. The situation surrounding Windows RT devices, since you specifically mention a x86 operating system my comment is restricted to x86 UEFI devices. –  Ramhound Sep 23 '13 at 17:38

2 Answers 2

I am working my way through this problem though I want to keep Windows 8 as it occasionally comes in useful.

So far I have installed Linux, but can´t get grub working.

Anyway, as far as I can tell, everything you asked to do seems possible

http://askubuntu.com/questions/221835/installing-ubuntu-on-a-pre-installed-windows-8-64-bit-system-uefi-supported

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please try to be specific and Provide context for links. –  Ash Oct 6 '13 at 17:43

You should be able to do so... simply set the BIOS to boot from the optical drive and stick the Linux CD in. If that doesn't work, format your hard drive before installing Linux.

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I don't believe this adequately covers what the OP was asking about, which is a UEFI-locked bootloader, such as the Windows Surface RT tablets. –  Darth Android Sep 23 '13 at 17:21
    
@DarthAndroid - The question isn't about a Windows RT device. The question mentions Windows 8. While Windows RT shared the same kernel as Windows 8 its an entirely different operating system and an entirely different hardware architecture. Windows RT devices are as locked down as any other ARM device the limitations of the inability to load another operating ssytem isn't anything new even on Chrome OS devices for instance. –  Ramhound Sep 23 '13 at 17:36
    
@Ramhound I was pretty sure about that, but that is exactly what an answer here needed. The question is about a UEFI bootloader that prevents other OSes being installed. I only know of Windows RT tablets that have that. The OP wanted to know if his system had that. –  Darth Android Sep 23 '13 at 18:28
    
@DarthAndroid - He didn't even tell us WHAT device he plans on buying. This question has nothing to do with ARM devices. ALL x86 Windows 8 devices have their bootloader unlocked its a requirement to get a Windows 8 logo on your device. The things he is wondering about are complete rumors, false rumors, started by people who don't understand the OEM market and spread by really bad tech bloggers. Furthermore the locked down nature of the UEFI isn't anything new for OS X with its TPM module and all that jazz. –  Ramhound Sep 23 '13 at 18:47
    
@Ramhound Cool. Again, he didn't know that, which is why he was asking this question. That's why I downvoted this answer, because it didn't answer the question that was asked. –  Darth Android Sep 23 '13 at 19:05

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