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I have two PC, A and B, connected by a switch.

I installed ipv6 on both of them.

Autoconfigure give them 2 IPV6 address:

A

preferred link-local fe80::21e:4fff:fec4:50f7, life infinite

B

preferred link-local fe80::221:9bff:fe32:811e, life infinite

But when I try to ping B from A:

ping6 fe80::221:9bff:fe32:811e

The system says there is no route.

But how to add the route?

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2 Answers

1 . Use netsh interface ipv6 show interface on Host A to obtain the link-local address and the interface index for the Ethernet interface.

For example, the link-local address of Host A is FE80::210:5AFF:FEAA:20A2, and the interface index of the Ethernet interface is 4.

2 . Use netsh interface ipv6 show interface on Host B to obtain the link-local address and the interface index for the Ethernet interface.

For example, the link-local address of Host B is FE80::260:97FF:FE02:6EA5, and the interface index for the Ethernet interface is 3.

3 . From Host A, use Ping.exe to ping Host B.

For example, ping FE80::260:97FF:FE02:6EA5%4

Source

The interface index is also known as the zone index. The zone index differs by operating system. Windows example is given above. This is needed because the only routing information your hosts have is the FE80 address prefix.

For most unix like systems (Linux) use fe80::%eth0

For Mac OS X fe80::%en0

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@grawity This has nothing to do with "adding routes". –  Mark Robinson Nov 3 '09 at 15:02
    
Feh. I really need to sleep() more. –  grawity Nov 4 '09 at 15:32
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Link-local addresses (fe80::/10) usually are used with a zone index. In Windows it's the interface number (such as %4), in Unix-like systems - interface name (%eth0).

So if I was running Linux and a system was reachable through eth0 (the remote system's OS does not matter), I would use:

ping6 fe80::213:d4ff:fef4:2bc4%eth0

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