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Got a weird one: I recently bought a house and have noticed a RJ45 wall socket in the theatre room. The phone socket is 17.2m at the end of the house near the kitchen.

Am I correct to say that the only way to get internet so to hook up the modem to the phone socket, configure it and run the internet for the PC via wireless? Why would anyone have a RJ45 wall socket there? I asked one of the techs here at work and they reckon that I could potentially be able to connect to the internet via this ethernet (RJ45) cable. I have a Billion 7800n modem/router.

Thanks for your help in advance.

Dan.

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Why would anyone have ran wires in the wall? The simplest answer is to avoid running wires in other ways. You need to find where the other end of the wire runs. Wireless isn't the only way to get "internet" in your house. –  Ramhound Sep 24 '13 at 12:04
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There really is no way for us to tell. It is a socket in the wall. Are any wires attached to it? If there are wires, where do they go? What quality wires are they? (CAT3, CAT 5E? ..) Etc etc etc –  Hennes Sep 24 '13 at 12:06
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Am I correct to say that the only way to get internet so to hook up the modem to the phone socket, configure it and run the internet for the PC via wireless?

Yes you are correct. You should ask the Service Provider to check the telephone line for you and then you can sign up. I'm not sure what the RJ45 socket / patch could be, it must trace to somewhere though - have you tried looking around the house for another possible RJ45 patch? My best guest is the previous owner did not get wireless signal in the theatre and therefore installed a long RJ45 cable from the one point to the theatre.

The phone socket is 17.2m at the end of the house near the kitchen.

I would also advise to get a High Powered Wifi router OR a wireless signal booster, since 17M is above the standard support of coverage of Access Points (8-10M). This is going to decrease the quality greatly, consider asking your Service Provider for more information regarding the high powered routers.

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Two more options in addition to the High Powered Wifi Accesspoint (no need for it to be a router) OR a wireless signal booster: 1) powerline adaptors. 2) Wired (least hassle to lay your own line, just works, fastest, cheapest). You might even be able to use the old cable either as signal or to use it to pull a new (CAT 5E) cable though the wall. –  Hennes Sep 24 '13 at 12:14
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