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Are there any default listening ports in Linux, like 135 and 445 for directory services in Windows?

While searching for a remote machine, I need to identify whether the machine I am connecting to is Linux or not, to perform some scripting operations based on OS.

I can't use tool like NMap, Since my application is a commercial one and Source code should be a closed one.

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What are you really trying to do here? –  Blacklight Shining Oct 7 '13 at 14:15
    
@BlacklightShining He's trying to identify a remote machine's operating system based on the ports it has open, I think it's pretty clear. –  Moses Oct 7 '13 at 14:25
    
you won't be able to do this. nmap/zenmap probe the IP implementation itself to profile the OS. each TCP/IP stack implementation has idiosyncrasies in how they respond to different kinds of input packets (flags, syn/ack values, fragments, etc) and nmap has a database of indicators which can be used to try to determine teh os in question. –  Frank Thomas Oct 7 '13 at 14:31
    
@BlacklightShining: Mr. Moses is right. –  CMB Oct 7 '13 at 14:31
    
@FrankThomas: I know Mr. frank. But I can't use GPL Licensed tool for my commercial application. But I need to detect OS atleast approximately to reduce my runtime. That's why posted this question. –  CMB Oct 7 '13 at 14:33

2 Answers 2

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Linux has no default "signature" ports, since many of the ports that it uses are not unique to it.

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The most common listening port on linux systems is port 22 (used for ssh).

You can check for other open ports by calling lsof -i (as root) on the linux machine.

Also an answer to a similar question (which was solved by using nmap) suggests, that you could find out the operating system using only the ping command.

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