Take the 2-minute tour ×
Super User is a question and answer site for computer enthusiasts and power users. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Simple question- what would a crontab entry look like for a command I want to run every week on Saturday at 8:05 AM?

share|improve this question

migrated from stackoverflow.com Nov 8 '09 at 1:25

This question came from our site for professional and enthusiast programmers.

add comment

7 Answers

That should do it:

5 8 * * 6 <user> <command>

documentation (man 5 crontab):

              field          allowed values
              -----          --------------
              minute         0-59
              hour           0-23
              day of month   1-31
              month          1-12 (or names, see below)
              day of week    0-7 (0 or 7 is Sun, or use names)
share|improve this answer
add comment
5     8     *     *     6         *your command*
share|improve this answer
add comment

Sat 8:05AM run find

# Minute   Hour   Day of Month       Month          Day of Week        Command    
# (0-59)  (0-23)     (1-31)    (1-12 or Jan-Dec)  (0-6 or Sun-Sat)                
    5       8          *             *                Sat              /usr/bin/find
share|improve this answer
add comment

http://www.scrounge.org/linux/cron.html

5 8 * * 6 /usr/bin/foo

...to run every week on Saturday at 8:05 AM

share|improve this answer
add comment

From extensive investigation of "man 5 crontab", it looks like this'll do the trick:

5 8 * * sat /usr/bin/man 5 crontab

share|improve this answer
add comment

These answers are all correct, if you are unaware of how to use cron in the future, use one of many cron generators.

share|improve this answer
add comment

You can also do like this:

Change crontab:

5 8    * * *   <user>   cd / && run-parts --report /etc/cron.daily

And put all your command scripts in this directory /etc/cron.daily. Make sure that you have added the execution rights for them.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.