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I just bought and installed a new ASUS RT-AC68U wireless router and it works very well for most devices on my home network but others experience Internet outages at random intervals of time. I haven't had any such on Debian 7.2 and IOS 7 but this happens several times a day on Windows 7 and 8 as well as on Android 4.3. The router is configured to assign static IP addresses via DHCP based on MAC address. One of the devices that experiences this problem has IP address 192.168.1.4. It runs Windows 7 and this is what I can see in the router log when it looses Internet connection:

Dec 24 19:38:27 miniupnpd[3315]: recv (state0): Connection reset by peer
Dec 24 19:38:27 miniupnpd[3315]: HTTP Connection from 192.168.1.4 closed unexpectedly
Dec 24 20:33:46 miniupnpd[3315]: Expired NAT-PMP mapping port 1224 UDP removed
Dec 24 20:33:46 miniupnpd[3315]: Expired NAT-PMP mapping port 1224 TCP removed
Dec 24 21:58:38 miniupnpd[3315]: sendto(udp): Operation not permitted

Any idea why this happens and how to fix it?

EDIT: I get these mystical entries in the router log too:

Dec 25 01:36:27 kernel: br0: received packet on eth2 with own address as source address
Dec 25 01:37:03 kernel: br0: received packet on eth1 with own address as source address
Dec 25 01:38:00 kernel: br0: received packet on eth2 with own address as source address
Dec 25 01:41:39 kernel: br0: received packet on eth1 with own address as source address
Dec 25 01:42:16 kernel: br0: received packet on eth2 with own address as source address
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Check your microwave :) –  gronostaj Dec 25 '13 at 18:35

1 Answer 1

First plug in to the internet directly and run off of that for awhile. Make absolutely sure in your own mind that it's not your ISP dropping out from time to time.

Then get another router. They don't cost that much relative to debug time which has the probability of success of about zero. I've seen very funky wifi routers that drop funny packets at random times.

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I had another router (Netgear) which was quite old, slow and didn't suit my needs. I never had a problem like this with the old router. But the new one causes me this trouble since day 1. –  RegedUser00x Dec 26 '13 at 9:18
    
I had a netgear too. Worked fine at my house until I switched ISPs. It didn't like the new ISP. Gave it to my girl friend where it worked ok for the next few years. Go figure. Truth is these things are full blown computers in a small box. There is a lot going on inside and if you've ever looked at a stack trace of the packets involved it is very complex. Also as you use superuser.com be sure to give people answering your questions some points by clicking the up arrows. Thanks. –  Eliptical View Dec 26 '13 at 18:21
    
Sure, I always give up arrows to people on stackoverflow but for superuser I have rating 13 and I cannot give up arrows if I don't have at least 15. –  RegedUser00x Dec 26 '13 at 18:58

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