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Is it possible to view the contents of a remote PXE/TFTP Server on a Windows PC? I would like to get the pxelinux.0 file off of a remote server, but when I connect using WinSCP or just Explorer I get prompted for credentials. When an user PXE boots they don't get prompted for credentials... How does this work?

Update: ALBUM: http://imgur.com/a/eWOXc/all

I checked the DHCP server once again, our scope is currently: PICTURE 2 OF ALBUM

As you can clearly see the Boot Server Host Name is :"10.26.30.15". Pinging the host has a positive result: PICTURE 3 OF ALBUM

However a port-scan doesn't have a positive result (TFTP and PXE ports are not open): PICTURE 4 OF ALBUM

And when I try to use TFTPD32 or something I just get this: PICTURE 1 OF ALBUM

No success still...

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Quoting Wikipedia:

Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP) is a file transfer protocol notable for its simplicity. It is generally used for automated transfer of configuration or boot files between machines in a local environment. Compared to FTP, TFTP is extremely limited, providing no authentication, and is rarely used interactively by a user.

If you try to connect to a TFTP server using WinSCP or Windows Explorer, most likely those applications are trying to establish an authenticated FTP or SMB connection with the server. Try using an application like TFTPD32, which can be run as a TFTP server, but you will want to run it as a client to connect to your PXE/TFTP server and download the file you want.

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Thanks, I did try this software before. However when I set the remote file param to pxelinux.0 and press "get", It just times out... Seems like I have to change some settings on our PXE server? –  user284584 Dec 26 '13 at 22:26
    
You are very close. If I were you, the next troubleshooting steps I would perform are: 1) verify connectivity by pinging the IP address of your PXE/TFTP server from the computer you're running TFTPD32 or PumpKin on, 2) check the directory structure of where your pxelinux.0 file is, and make sure you're 'get'ting the file from the right location (I'm trying to remember if there's a 'home' directory location on TFTPD32 or on the TFTP server itself), 3) to further verify, trying uploading a file to your TFTP/PXE server, then check the server and see where it shows up. –  Baodad Dec 28 '13 at 17:24
    
Thanks, Uploading doesn't work either... I think something is wrong in the configuration (which is strange because PXE booting laptops still work)ALBUM: imgur.com/a/eWOXc/all I checked the DHCP server once again, our scope is currently: PICTURE 2 OF ALBUM As you can clearly see the Boot Server Host Name is :"10.26.30.15". Pinging the host has a positive result: PICTURE 3 OF ALBUM However a port-scan doesn't have a positive result (TFTP and PXE ports are not open): PICTURE 4 OF ALBUM And when I try to use TFTPD32 or something I just get this: PICTURE 1 OF ALBUM No success still... –  user284584 Dec 30 '13 at 19:26
    
Thanks for posting screenshots. My knowledge is at an end, but my guess is that since you are using a Windows Server to serve up the pxelinux.0 file, it is not behaving like a true TFTP server. –  Baodad Dec 31 '13 at 3:55
    
Thank you very much, you have been very helpful :) I've found a way to get the old Administrator back, he is currently copying and editing all neccesary files. So this is fixed :) Thanks! –  user284584 Dec 31 '13 at 13:16

Alternatively to tftpd32, you can also use PumpKin to access remote TFTP sites.

http://kin.klever.net/pumpkin

enter image description here

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Thank you for the suggestion, however this doesn't work either.. Great program though, will definitely remember this for use in the future :) –  user284584 Dec 26 '13 at 22:41

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