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For non-bittorrent files I can usually get 1MB/s down on my home network, and 10MB down on a professionally hosted computer.

When I download a file using bittorrent I often get maxed out on the hosted machine, but only get 90kb/s on my home computer.

I don't believe my upload speed has anything to do with it as the files have many seeders. My upload speed on the hosted computer is negligable.

I can get other files (http/ftp) at 1MB/s at home. Just not bit-torrent. Apart from ISP throttling, which I'm told is not in effect, what would be causing this?

At the moment the fastest way for me to download a file is to get it on the hosted computer and then download it to my home computer over http - which just doesn't strike me as the best thing to do.

Edit: Using uTorrent. b=bit/ B=byte. Would my consumer router be the cause? Limiting number of connections perhaps?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The most common cause of this problem is having your BitTorrent software set up to have too many maximum connections. Most BT software (even the most recommended ones) have default settings that will make most home routers cry.

In your BitTorrent client, find the area where you can set the maximums and set it WAY lower. Start with something like 50, let it run for a few hours, and then maybe try increasing it.

The cause of this is the plain and simple fact that home routers are by and large not designed to handle so many concurrent connections. It just isn't normal outside the world of BitTorrent. This would completely explain why you are seeing different performance from a machine being hosted at a professional hosting company, which probably uses business-class routers.

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Thanks OverloadUT. That makes a lot of sense. –  Mr. Flibble Nov 13 '09 at 0:41
    
So I reduced the max connections down to 50 and it had an amazing effect. I'm maxing out now at a shade under 1MB/s. Thank for the tip OverloadUT. –  Mr. Flibble Nov 13 '09 at 17:18

You mention that your ISP isn't throttling, but it wouldn't hurt to verify that -you can do that here

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Thanks chris. This test says BT isn't throttled. Got 768kB/s down in the test. –  Mr. Flibble Nov 13 '09 at 0:39

Macha has a point about the "bytes vs bits", but if I assume you know this, there can be many other factors that lead to this problem.

First, check to make sure there has not been a setting flipped in the configuration panel. Then double check.

Also, make sure your port is open/routed to your network IP. I have seen this cause a drastic slowdown in performance.

Also, could you please include what client are you using?

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I can get other files (http/ftp) at 1MB/s at home. Just not bit-torrent.

Well then. You're being hit by protocol-based (DPI) throttling.

Whilst the factors listed by OverloadUT are all true, they aren't the most common BitTorrent bottleneck. BitTorrent clients aren't completely stupid and don't in the typical case overload the router. They can, sure, but ISP throttling is by far the more likely explanation.

Apart from ISP throttling, which I'm told is not in effect

Ha! Yeah, sorry. Your ISP will tell you that. Because they're liars. Who are they? If you're in the UK or US they almost certainly have a “Fair Usage Policy” that states in small print you're not going to get any bandwidth if they don't feel like it.

the fastest way for me to download a file is to get it on the hosted computer and then download it to my home computer over http - which just doesn't strike me as the best thing to do.

Welcome to seedboxing. It's what everyone else does.

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Cheers bobince. The number of connections seem to have been the problem in my case, reducing it to 50 seems to have solved the problem. –  Mr. Flibble Nov 13 '09 at 17:19
    
Great! 50's still quite a lot. –  bobince Nov 14 '09 at 10:39

Your ISP may be measuring your Internet speed in megabits while your client measures in kilobytes.

1 megabit = 128 kilobytes

@Chris: 1 megaBYTE = 1024 kilobytes. 1 megaBIT is 128.

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I'm using b for bits and B for bytes in my post. My connection is fine for non-bittorrent traffic - I get 1MB/s over http. –  Mr. Flibble Nov 13 '09 at 0:16
    
And isn't 1 megabit = 1024 (2^10) kilobytes? –  chris Nov 13 '09 at 21:11
    
1 megaBYTE = 1024 kilobytes. 1 megaBIT is 128. –  Macha Dec 2 '09 at 18:24

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