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In my workplace I get flooded with emails and setting rules helps a lot. I've channeled emails I'm only CC'd on to a separate folder. It's quite a bold move but at least means my main Inbox only shows email someone wants me, specifically, to read. But sometimes people continue conversations on the CC email chains and ask me a question at some point - a question I won't see until maybe the end of the week, if ever. So:

  • Can I create a rule that looks for my name (or whatever word/text) in the CURRENT message body - but NOT pick up my name in the To: and CC: lines of previous emails in the chain? The action could then be to flag it or some other suitable action to highlight it as different from others

When I have tried to create a rule searching for my name in the message body it does unfortunately pick up my name in the CC: line from previous emails in the chain, meaning it just flags every email.

Thanks

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How good are you with VBA? Using the information at support.microsoft.com/kb/292063 you could write some VBA which splits up the body of an incoming message and then looks for your name whilst ignoring the "To:", "From:" and "CC:" lines. –  Richard Jan 22 at 15:07
    
I'd be very interested in this answer as well. –  ServerGuy Oct 16 at 9:54

1 Answer 1

It sounds like it's picking up your name in the CC field from the quoted text of the previous messages. If that's the case, then you can't accomplish what you want, at least not without the cooperation of all email correspondents. :)

The problem then is that the quoted text (usually including the To, From, CC, subject, etc. text) is inserted into the (current) message body by the mail client(s).

You can't prevent them from quoting previous messages, so you can't prevent them from adding your name to the message body when quoting previous emails that you were CCed.

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