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I have spent the past few hours trying to figure out how to use Windows Firewall on a Windows 7 Home Premium computer. From what I can tell, it was definitely designed for computers in business networks that have access to Active Directory and group policies.

Basically, all I want to do is block traffic on port 5357 (Microsoft Network Discovery), as well as a few others, unless it comes from a local device aside from the default gateway as part of an effort to harden security on my home network. The logical thing in my mind was to create a Block policy, then create an Allow policy as an exception that includes the local IP addresses of my home's devices within its scope. However, I then learned that Windows Firewall is set so that Block policies ALWAYS override Allow policies, which seems completely backwards.

The only way around this seems to be the "Allow the connection if it is secure" option. This brings even more confusion. For one, this seems to require IPSec, which I am unfamiliar with - I can find plenty of info on "what" it is but nothing on how to actually implement it. Secondly, in order to specify authorized users/computers for exceptions, I have to use "objects types" which I have no idea how to set up - the only ones available are the defaults. Information on how to set up the groups for these exceptions would be extremely appreciated but might not be essential to the question. My guess is that it's not possible on a home OS without third-party software.

The next logical step for me was to forget all this and attempt to do it on my router instead, but my router appears unable to perform the extremely essential task of blocking specific ports.

So, I suppose my question is: What methods are available in Windows 7 Home Premium to block a specific port while still allowing local traffic on that port?

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