Take the 2-minute tour ×
Super User is a question and answer site for computer enthusiasts and power users. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm currently running a startup script in form of a bat file successfully in Windows 7 (I've inserted a new registry key entry with the bat file path as value in

Computer\HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run).

Now I need to run another bat file at startup, but with elevated rights (as administrator), and without manually confirming a prompt.

How can I achieve this, preferrably without external programs?

share|improve this question
    
Does this one have a solution? serverfault.com/questions/429364/… –  Radek Sep 18 '12 at 6:55

7 Answers 7

See this article : Make Vista launch UAC restricted programs at startup with Task Scheduler.

This article shows how to use the Task Scheduler to launch startup programs with elevated privileges. Some small changes may be required in your case, but the article is well-written with screenshots.

share|improve this answer

Have you thought of a different approach? Either a pure group policy for the equivelent registry setting, else setting the batch file to run as a group policy. It maybe that you could even run it as a computer script, rather than a user script.

Start with gpedit.msc. However, it does need Ultimate or one of the other top end editions.

share|improve this answer

Make two batch files:

StartAs.bat contains something along the lines of:

runas /user:SomeLocalAdminAccount c:\Users\MyUser\StartupWhat.bat

StartWhat.bat contains the commands that you want to run.

share|improve this answer
    
Still asks that the file be run with elevated priveledges –  Joe Taylor Sep 27 '11 at 13:45

AutoExnt utility, from the Resource Kit.

The AutoExNT service permits an administrator to configure a Windows based computer to run a custom batch file when first starting the computer. Also, a user or administrator is not required to be logged on at the time this custom batch file runs.

share|improve this answer

runas /user:SomeLocalAdminAccount

Here must be like this:

runas /noprofile /user:mymachine\administrator cmd

runas /profile /env /user:mydomain\admin "mmc %windir%\system32\dsa.msc

runas /env /user:user@domain.microsoft.com "notepad \"my file.txt\""
share|improve this answer
1  
Still asks that the file be run with elevated priveledges –  Joe Taylor Sep 27 '11 at 13:45

Maybe UACPass (free) will solve it:

  • Install the program.
  • Open the UACPass window.
  • Drag to it the program you are pretending to run at boot.

Done. This program should now run as admin without UAC prompt.
The program even has an option for add to startup :-D .

Your program will only run after logon (or so I think).

share|improve this answer

You can also make a shortcut and specify that the shortcut's file should be run elevated.

(It's in some advanced options box.)

share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't work for shortcuts to bat files. Try it. –  Joe Taylor Sep 27 '11 at 13:43
    
@JoeTaylor And how about creating a shortcut to cmd.exe and giving the bat file in the cmdline? –  Werner Henze Nov 27 '13 at 17:43
    
@werner Henze - have you tried it? –  Joe Taylor Dec 2 '13 at 13:01
    
@JoeTaylor: This doesn't work for shortcuts to bat files. What exactly do you mean with this? The "run as admin" Checkbox is available for shortcuts to a bat file and for shortcuts to cmd.exe (both tested a few minutes ago). But: the questioner does not want the UAC prompt, and the Checkbox will Trigger the UAC prompt (depending on the UAC Settings). –  Werner Henze Dec 2 '13 at 13:13
    
The run as elevated, whilst surpressing UAC prompts does not work in the way that the answer intends it to. That's what I meant. Therefore it is not the answer the OP was looking for. –  Joe Taylor Dec 2 '13 at 13:18

protected by studiohack Apr 27 '11 at 1:43

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality answers, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site.

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.