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What is considered to be the highest safe CPU temperature when overclocking?

I have a Core 2 Duo E6400 overclocked to 2.85GHz with 1.2vCore. This runs at 29C idle and 45C under load. These temperatures are captured using Speed Fan and PC Probe.

I know these temperatures are fine, but if I want to push it to over 3.0GHz what sort of maximum temperature limit should I set?

Thanks,
Gary

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2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

61.4 degrees centigrade. Of course, this leaves zero margin for safety, and your motherboard may or may not record temps in half-degree increments. So I'd stick with 60 as a nice round number that happens to give you about 1.5-2 degrees of wiggle room. This would be the maximum upper limit of what your CPU would handle, you'll be pushing the envelope of its design.

If you plan on keeping this overclocked forever and a day, I'd even consider something lower, so that the safety factor involved is larger, say 55 degrees.

And of course, this advice is given with the standard disclaimer that if you cook it by overclocking it, it was your decision, not mine; I'm not responsible for what you do; and you get to keep the burnt bits and pieces.

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So 61.4 is really the upper limit to prevent the cpu burning out? Thought it'd be a bit higher. –  GaryJL Jul 17 '09 at 14:55
    
typo noted, fixed. –  Avery Payne Jul 17 '09 at 14:57
    
Disclaimer duly noted! Thanks. –  GaryJL Jul 17 '09 at 14:59
    
I hate disclaimers like that. But it's needed where I'm at. That being said, good luck, and I hope you get it to a nice speed without cooking it! –  Avery Payne Jul 17 '09 at 15:11

From Intel's site:

Package Specifications
Thermal Specification 61.4°C

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