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I have an update URL that I need to access. It has all the parameters in the URL to do its job. I don't need to see it in the browser nor do I need its contents to be saved. Is there a program that will simply fetch an HTTPS URL from the command line for Windows? (preferably free ;) Thanks!

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Did you try wget already? –  and31415 Feb 20 at 20:58
    
Thanks for the recommendation. I'm having some trouble with the URL. There are 4 parts to the query string: host, domain, password, and ip. The errors I get are: 'domain' is not recognized as an internal or external command, operable program or batch file. 'password' is not recognized as an internal or external command, operable program or batch file. 'ip' is not recognized as an internal or external command, operable program or batch file. –  pkSML Feb 20 at 21:29
    
It seems to stop realizing the URL at the first ampersand. My URL is along these lines: https ://host.com/update?host=subdomain&domain=mydomain.com&password=mypass&ip=27.42.3‌​5.99 (space was inserted so it would display right) –  pkSML Feb 20 at 21:34
    
Enclose the URL inside straight quotes ("); &()[]{}^=;!'+,``~ are reserved characters of the Windows command line interpreter. –  and31415 Feb 20 at 22:02
    
Ahhhh I see! One last thing. SSL is so confusing. What I need to accomplish is to have the URL encrypted by HTTPS before it's sent out (because a password is right in the URL itself). If I use the --no-check-certificate directive, will my URL still remain secure and encrypted across the internet? (And if you put your response as an answer instead of a comment, I can upvote you :) –  pkSML Feb 21 at 2:00

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use wget:

GNU Wget is a free utility for non-interactive download of files from the Web. It supports HTTP, HTTPS, and FTP protocols, as well as retrieval through HTTP proxies.

Source: Overview - GNU Wget Manual

Type wget.exe -h or wget.exe --help to display basic command line usage. For further information, check the GNU Wget Manual.

There's a Firefox add-on called cliget which can help you get the correct wget command.

Note Make sure to enclose the URL inside straight quotes ("), because &()[]{}^=;!'+,``~ are reserved characters of the Windows command line interpreter.

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Third party software is not required to do this. Here are a few ways you can make HTTP requests from Windows PowerShell:

  1. Invoke-WebRequest
  2. Invoke-RestMethod
  3. System.Net.WebClient

If you insist on using third party software, you could use cURL.

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