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How can I sort multiple columns in Excel? So first sort culumn B and then A, D

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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can sort on as many columns as you like with any version of Excel, by sorting 1 column at a time, in the reverse order.
E.g: if you need a sort on col. B, F, C, A in that order of precedence, just sort on A, then on C, then on F, then on B.

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This is the best answer. In excel 2003, you are limited to three sorted keys. I am not sure if that has been changed in excel 2007. If you sort from "last to first" in sequence, you can sort by any number of columns. –  Kije Nov 26 '09 at 21:45
    
@Kije, you're no more limited in Excel 2003 than any other version. Just select a cell in the lowest-priority column, hit sort, select a cell in the next priority, hit sort, rinse and repeat until done. –  Martha Oct 21 '10 at 18:47

Select the data

File -> Data -> Sort

I think you can only sort by upto 3 columns....

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This is barely programming related, but none the less here is how you do it:

If you're running Excel 2007, mark the area you want to sort, select the "data" tab, hit "sort" and then choose how you want to sort your data. To add more levels of sorting, hit the "Add level"-button.

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It's possible. if u try in Excel 2007. Select the columns and data tab and hit Sort tab and in the Sort tab which column you require first, last or whatever prefernece you like and whether it is asc or desc, we can choose from "Add Level" button. It works more than 3 !

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