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Ummm... The question How to block specific HTTPS traffic? seems to have an answer somewhere, but...

What I want is to do to https what hosts does to http, that is, redirect the request to someplace like "home" (127.0.0.1) with a file lookup. 0.0.0.0 would do in this case, provided the timeout isn't too long. I'm currently using eDexter to handle my unwanted http requests. I do have Proxomitron somewhere in my Basement if it's relevant.

I do not need to do this for the whole LAN, just this box, or any other box that needs it. I'm using W7HPx64, Avast! 7.0.1466 and a Draytek 2710Vn NAT router.

Gordon.

EDIT: eDexter and Homer (site is currently down) are proxies which monitor 127.0.0.1 and return a small image to the requesting browser when they detect the traffic referred by hosts, thereby eliminating timeouts and WAN delays. END EDIT

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I assume with "hosts" you mean your hosts file C:\windows\system32\drivers\etc\hosts. Then you are misunderstanding the purpose of this file. The hosts file maps hostnames to IPs and as such works for all higher protocols, including https. –  bjanssen May 25 at 8:03
    
@bjanssen I wish! Sadly, at StackOverflow it is explained why this cannot be done, and it certainly supports my own empirical results. And yes, I am familiar with the original purpose of hosts as well as the mundane convenience documented at (for example) There's no place like 127.0.0.1. –  Gordon Edwards May 25 at 11:39
    
The statements in the StackOverflow post and my own are not contradictory. The hosts file maps hostnames to IPs. Nothing more, nothing less. As such it only applies to the hostname-portion of any request. It does so completely and utterly independent of the port and/or the higher-layer protocol. –  bjanssen May 25 at 11:46
    
After reading my last comment, I realize I still haven't touched on the core issue. The core issue is that the hosts file has nothing to do with protocol based redirections. –  bjanssen May 25 at 12:01
    
@bjanssen: You're right!!!!!! I just entered a couple of seriously annoying sites, and bless-my-soul, they worked! Now all I have to do is figure what I did wrong on previous attempts :( Is there a way to mark one of your comments as the answer? I think a number of people are looking for this answer, judging by the search results I have seen. –  Gordon Edwards May 25 at 12:29

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The hosts file is not doing what the question supposes it does. The hosts file only maps hostnames to IPs. As such it only applies to the hostname-portion of any request. It does so completely and utterly independent of the port and/or the higher-layer protocol, in other words, the hosts file has nothing to do with protocol based redirections.

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