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I live in a building where we share a static IP address. Looks like a roommate got banned from a website where I also have an account, and now I can't visit this website either.

I had to install a proxy plug-in in my browser in order to access this website. However, it only works if I visit this page by the browser, when I try to obtain their services from a specific client software, the connection is refused.

So how can I apply the same IP that the browser uses, to all my connections and softwares? Is there any ways this can be achieved? I'm using Windows 8.0.

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What OS are you on? – Wutnaut Jul 7 '14 at 20:33
    
I'm using Windows 8.0. Forgot to put it in the question... I will add this. – arthur Jul 7 '14 at 20:36
    
    
@techie007 Man... I don't uderstand much about networking, and I dont understand nothing about that question, looks complicated... I don't want to use my computer as a router, or provide anonymous traffic to any clientes. I will try An Dorfer solution for now... – arthur Jul 7 '14 at 20:48
up vote 1 down vote accepted

One very easy way to do this, which unfortunately costs money, is to use a commercial VPN service. This will tunnel your traffic from your PC to a different entry point on the Internet, with a different IP address. I have used www.strongvpn.com for this purpose and it suited my needs well. You can get an account for less than $5/month. There are many other alternatives.

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That was just what I needed. For now I'm am using a free FVP service, maybe later I might use a commercial one, anyway, it worked just fine. Thanks! :) – arthur Jul 8 '14 at 17:38
    
You're right - this looks very promising: freevpn.me – BobDoolittle Sep 17 '14 at 14:46

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