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I'm opening an Excel file and I'm getting the File in use pop-up that says it's locked for editing by me. However, I've not got it open on this computer (I think I had it open and my machine blue-screened). How do I go about fixing this?

Should specify, this is a file on a file share.

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marked as duplicate by gronostaj, slhck Aug 20 at 10:39

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
download.cnet.com/Unlocker/3000-2248_4-10493998.html (be sure to skip the bundled software offers) –  krowe Aug 11 at 8:10
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did you tired copying that file to another location and then opening it? –  lemon Aug 11 at 8:28
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Is this file in a shared location? –  Dave Aug 11 at 8:54

1 Answer 1

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Microsoft Office tracks those locks using files that are created in the same directory as the original file. The document Somedoc.docx gets a temporary lock file (Microsoft calls it an "owner file"): ~$Somedoc.docx. The same goes for Powerpoint and Excel. The owner of that file is the owner reported in the dialog.

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The easiest way out is to delete that file. It is a hidden file, so you should set your Windows Explorer to view "protected operating system files":

  1. Open Folder Options by clicking the Start button, clicking Control Panel, click Appearance and Personalization, and then click Folder Options.
  2. Click the View tab.
  3. Under Advanced settings, click Show hidden files, folders, and drives,
  4. Un-Check Hide protected operating system files (Recommended), and then click OK.

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You should see that file in the same directory the original file is in. Delete it and open the document again.

This situation is explained more elaborately here.

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