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How can I configure the Windows 7 Task Manager to always display processes from all users? I don't want ot always have to click on the button in the bottom left corner.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Here you go:

Create a Shortcut or Hotkey to Open Task Manager’s "All Users" View in Windows 7 or Vista

One of the reasons why I prefer to use the built-in administrator account, no button, but a checkbox. :)

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You can also use Process Explorer as your task manager. This one shows all the processes by default, as well as a lot of other information which the default one doesn't show.

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not really answering the question, do you? :) –  Molly7244 Dec 11 '09 at 18:50
1  
You are right. Just pointing out an alternative. –  fretje Dec 11 '09 at 18:55
    
For process explorer to show you the user names you must run it As Administrator. –  Daniel Williams Sep 4 '11 at 4:07

You only need to click on the "Show processes from all users" button once.
Win7 will remember this setting for the next time.

If this isn't happening for you, then there's a problem.

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no problem but the default behaviour. –  Molly7244 Dec 11 '09 at 18:42
    
@Molly: Are you saying this is the default action? Then why have I never encountered it? –  harrymc Dec 11 '09 at 18:51
    
@harrymc: That isn't the default behavior for me on any of my Windows 7 machines. –  Chris_K Dec 11 '09 at 19:16
    
@harrymc: you have UAC turned off? –  Molly7244 Dec 11 '09 at 19:33
    
@Molly: I do. One more reason to hate UAC. –  harrymc Dec 11 '09 at 20:04

It is because of UAC. Viewing all processes requires elevated permissions (since it allows you to affect user accounts other than your own). Since elevation can require credentials or prompting, it's unable to open automatically. It's a security feature, basically. You can run with UAC off, but that introduces other risks and may or may not be worth it.

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