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I want to sign .exe files I produce. I already have code signing certificate, only last missing step is 'signtool.exe' (or any other tool that works and is free, preferrably command line so that it can be easily scripted).

My problem is that signtool.exe is part of .net framework sdk, which is huge download for this presumably small tool (selecting only win32 and .net tools gives me 0.5gb download). Is it possible to get this tool as a standalone download somewhere? (Google didn't help so far) Do you know some alternate small command line tool for signing .exe files?

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2 Answers

The SignTool tool is a command-line tool that digitally signs files, verifies signatures in files, or time stamps files.

SignTool is available as part of the Windows SDK, download link and ducumentation here.

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Thank you. My problem is that I only need single tool, but smallest download I was able to select via web-setup was about half gigabyte. –  Peter Štibraný Dec 13 '09 at 9:27
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Microsoft first released code signing technology ("Authenticode" in MS terminology) back in 1998. At that time microsoft provided a small (124 KB) self-extract ZIP file by the name "codesigningx86.exe".

Unfortunately this file is no longer available on Microsoft's site.

It may be downloaded from here and includes : signcode.exe, makecert.exe, cert2spc.exe, chktrust.exe, certmgr.exe, makecat.exe, makectl.exe.

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Thank you. Sounds like reasonable alternative to signtool.exe –  Peter Štibraný Dec 13 '09 at 9:28
    
As of 13 Aug 2013 the site referred to above says "18-07-2013 Server Maintenance in Progress. Please check back soon!" ... This solution may no longer be applicable. –  RedGrittyBrick Aug 13 '13 at 16:19
    
The site is down, but the tool can be found in many other places, for example here. Once posted, no file is ever lost. –  harrymc Aug 13 '13 at 17:01
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