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Python .msi installer (On Windows 7 64-bit) is installing all files in the root of the c: drive, instead of in c:\Python25 (where I told it).

I have tried creating the c:\Python25 before running the installer, which was no help.

The version of the installer I'm running is python-2.5.amd64.msi (for compatibility with Google App Engine).

Thanks,

Neal

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

Did you specify C:\Python25 as the install directory in the GUI installer? It should respect that setting. If not, you can specify a target install directory from the command line like this:

msiexec /i python-2.5.amd64.msi TARGETDIR=c:\python25

Ensure you are in the directory containing the msi when you run the command, and that command prompt has been run as administrator.

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Needs to be "Run as Admin" when you open command prompt. – NealWalters Dec 18 '09 at 4:32
    
Forgot about that tidbit, answer updated. Thanks! – John T Dec 18 '09 at 4:34
1  
So why doesn't it just fail instead of creating directories in the wrong place? I hate having to clean them up. – NealWalters Dec 18 '09 at 4:43
    
Bad installer design I suppose. Revo Uninstaller should take care of it for you: revouninstaller.com – John T Dec 18 '09 at 4:50

It's sad my memory is so bad. I had the same problem back in July on on Windows Vista 32-bt machine.

http://www.python-forum.org/pythonforum/viewtopic.php?f=15&t=13651&p=63528&hilit=root+dir#p63528

The solution was to open command prompt with "RUN AS ADMIN", then do this command: msiexec /i python-2.5.4.msi

I'm not sure why more people aren't having the same problem.

Neal

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It happens to the best of us :P – John T Dec 18 '09 at 4:32

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