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I want to record system resource utilization - CPU, RAM, SWAP, perhaps HD access - on my Ubuntu system over time so that I can compare two configurations (in my case, I am comparing using gnome vs. using xfce)

What would be a good way to record the system resource utilization and then graph the results on my Ubuntu system?

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use dstat with gnuplot for very detailed graphs:

alt text

There is also the option of vmstat with vmplot:

Sample vmstat output:

[john@awesome]$vmstat -n 1
procs -----------memory---------- ---swap-- -----io---- --system-- -----cpu------
 r  b   swpd   free   buff  cache   si   so    bi    bo   in   cs us sy id wa st
 1  0      0 14234008 438580 1195172    0    0     6    35    1    1  2  5 93  0  0
 1  0      0 14233824 438592 1195176    0    0     4   100 1035 2170  0 50 49  0  0
 1  0      0 14233824 438592 1195176    0    0     0    32 1030 2139  3 48 50  0  0

Sample vmplot graph:

alt text

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Swap the "dstat with gnuplot" answer with the "vmstat with vmplot" answer, and I'll select for my answer. Thanks for the info. – pcapademic Dec 28 '09 at 2:49
    
done & done! :) – John T Dec 28 '09 at 3:21

One obvious answer is to use the top command in conjunction with awk to pull out the values I'm interested in. I'm looking for something a little less labor intensive, as I will need to spend a lot of time reviewing the awk command to pull this off.

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