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I'm trying to fix a friends laptop running Vista. He told me his wireless networking wasn't working which I confirmed. I then tried the ethernet NIC and it also didn't work. I am unable to even ping localhost/127.0.0.1. I noticed when I issue an "ipconfig /all" command the assigned IP comes back with:

169.254.238.242 (Preferred)

My understanding is this comes back when the computer can't get an IP address using DHCP. I even tried assigning a static IP address (192.168.1.x for my home network) but no luck. I did some research and found this seems not to be an uncommon problem. I notice there are a lot of tunnels, etc. I'm not a big Vista guy so I'm not exactly sure what's going on here. I even tried upgrading the driver for the ethernet controller but no luck. I figure since it's happening with both wireless and the ethernet conroller it has something more to do with the the OS/dirver configuration. Here is the entire output of the ipconfig /all command:

Microsoft Windows [Version 6.0.6001]
Copyright (c) 2006 Microsoft Corporation.  All rights reserved.

C:\>ipconfig /all

Windows IP Configuration

   Host Name . . . . . . . . . . . . : Brent-PC
   Primary Dns Suffix  . . . . . . . :
   Node Type . . . . . . . . . . . . : Broadcast
   IP Routing Enabled. . . . . . . . : No
   WINS Proxy Enabled. . . . . . . . : No

Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection:

   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :
   Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Marvell Yukon 88E8040 PCI-E Fast Ethernet
 Controller
   Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-E0-B8-FC-DE-81
   DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes
   Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes
   Autoconfiguration IPv4 Address. . : 169.254.238.242(Preferred)
   Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.0.0
   Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . :
   NetBIOS over Tcpip. . . . . . . . : Enabled

Wireless LAN adapter Wireless Network Connection:

   Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :
   Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Atheros AR5B91 Wireless Network Adapter
   Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-22-69-8F-1A-AB
   DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No
   Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes

Tunnel adapter Local Area Connection* 6:

   Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :
   Description . . . . . . . . . . . : isatap.{9F10C518-8D3F-40BF-9D1B-15A8FDD95
808}
   Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-00-00-00-00-00-00-E0
   DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No
   Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes

Tunnel adapter Local Area Connection* 7:

   Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :
   Description . . . . . . . . . . . : isatap.{5559AAD9-B5EF-4392-A7B3-D9DF2A2B8
60E}
   Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-00-00-00-00-00-00-E0
   DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No
   Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes

Tunnel adapter Local Area Connection* 11:

   Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :
   Description . . . . . . . . . . . : isatap.{62E497EB-9F7D-4AA8-A696-3D1AAB6F9
C03}
   Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-00-00-00-00-00-00-E0
   DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No
   Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes

Tunnel adapter Local Area Connection* 12:

   Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :
   Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Teredo Tunneling Pseudo-Interface
   Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 02-00-54-55-4E-01
   DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No
   Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes

Tunnel adapter Local Area Connection* 13:

   Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :
   Description . . . . . . . . . . . : isatap.{15C75D20-E062-4983-8152-98017F1D1
A56}
   Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-00-00-00-00-00-00-E0
   DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No
   Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes
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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I figured out the problem after doing a little research. I ended up un-installing all Norton software (Norton 360 and Symantec Live Update), rebooted and everything worked great. IP address grabbed fine via DHCP and all is right with the world.

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Here are some ideas to try:

  1. Turn of all firewalls and anti-virus (uninstalling might be better, especially for Symantec).
  2. Disable and Turn Off IPv6 Support in Vista.
  3. Verify that hosts file contains 127.0.0.1 localhost.
  4. Verify that the following registry entry wasn't deleted:
    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\Tcpip\Parameters.
    See this article : Reinstall and Reset TCP/IP.
  5. Ensure that DHCP is used for IP address and DNS.
  6. Reset the routing table via route /f, then reboot.
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Sorry...no go. Tried everything and it still doesn't work. –  GregH Dec 29 '09 at 2:50
    
One more: In Device Manager, delete the network card and reboot to let Windows reinstall it. –  harrymc Dec 29 '09 at 14:47
    
I just tried that and Windows re-installs it but still grabs the bad ip address. –  GregH Dec 31 '09 at 5:07
    
You might try (1) In cmd : 'ipconfig /release' followed by 'ipconfig /renew', or (2) reboot in safe mode with networking to check if some application is blocking your access. –  harrymc Dec 31 '09 at 8:10

Given the information you've provided so far, it sounds like your TCP/IP stack has been corrupted. The first thing I'd suggest is to reset TCP/IP using a "Fix-It" program from Microsoft or by manually using the netsh command.

If that fails, you can try some of the following solutions:

  1. Right-click on the network connection and click "Diagnose and repair." Sometimes if that doesn't work, you can right-click the network connection and click "Disable," then wait a few seconds and right-click the connection and click "Enable."
  2. Uninstall/reinstall the hardware drivers. First uninstall the hardware drivers for the network adapter(s), then reinstall the latest drivers from the hardware manufacturer. I've had trouble with a lot of hardware drivers downloaded from Windows Update in the past.
  3. Uninstall/reinstall Windows Updates. A somewhat less likely cause is that Windows Update broke the system. If your friend has other symptoms (such as limited users being unable to logon, or the Event Logging Service failing to start), Windows may have been broken by installing a Windows Update recently. If that's the case, try to uninstall the updates one-by-one and rebooting between each one. (I once had this problem, and after uninstalling a few recent updates, I was able to reinstall all the updates without any problems--I chalked it up to a regression bug that was later fixed.)
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No luck...nothing seems to work –  GregH Dec 31 '09 at 5:06

You probably know this already, but I've had this problem. When troubleshooting, ensure all the firewall software is disabled. I've had some software lock down the connections to the point Windows couldn't use DHCP.

Good luck.

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