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I have a client bridge (LinkSys WRT54GL router with DD-WRT firmware). I specified an IP address of 192.168.1.2 for the device, however, when I run ipconfig, the default gateway is now 192.168.0.1. Similarly, when I try to connect to http://192.168.1.2, I can't access the administrative page for the router.

Any ideas?

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Would tracert give you any ideas? In other words, trace to your ISPs DNS, for example, and see what IPs you hit on the way. –  Michael Todd Jan 6 '10 at 18:42
1  
A bridge is a layer2 device. not a layer3 device. traceroute operates at layer3. –  user23307 Jan 17 '10 at 22:33

6 Answers 6

I have a client bridge

ok..

the default gateway is now 192.168.0.1.

because you have a bridge and your DHCP information comes from the router...

when I try to connect to http://192.168.1.2, I can't access the administrative page for the router.

because you are on the 192.168.0 network and neither your machine or your router knows anything about the 192.168.1 network. Do this:

  1. temporarily assign your computer an address of 192.168.1.100
  2. login to 192.168.1.2, reconfigure it to use 192.168.0.2(or just tell it to use dhcp)
  3. set your machine back to dhcp
  4. profit!
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You could perform a ping scan ( How can I ping a range of IP addresses simultaneously ).

It will scan a range of IP's and report on which ones are responding. Then you can guess and try to connect to those addresses which might be your device.

The command that worked for me on Linux:

el@defiant ~$ nmap -sP 192.168.13.1-255

Starting Nmap 6.01 ( http://nmap.org ) at 2014-02-10 16:48 EST
Nmap scan report for 192.168.13.79
Host is up (0.0016s latency).
Nmap scan report for 192.168.13.84
Host is up (0.00025s latency).
Nmap scan report for 192.168.13.88
Host is up (0.00021s latency).
Nmap scan report for 192.168.13.100
Host is up (0.00056s latency).
Nmap scan report for 192.168.13.108
Host is up (0.00069s latency).
Nmap done: 255 IP addresses (5 hosts up) scanned in 6.17 seconds

These are all the IP's that responded to a ping, I visited each of these IP's in a browser and I found one of them was my hidden client bridge.

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You can force the settings of the default gateway in your adapter properties.

Is it possible that you still have this set from how your previous connection was set up?

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Are you using DHCP on the client computer? The router should normally be the gateway (or the x.x.x.1 in your subnet) assigned; In this case, 192.168.0.1. Have you tried clearing any caches on the client? Ex. "repair" the connection. Are the administrative pages available on both sides of the bridge?

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Funny prerequisite question, are you sure you're on the right wireless network? Sorry, but experience has taught me to always ask that first.

The question to answer would be where did the current default gateway address from. Run "ipconfig /all" and check to see if it says "DHCP Enabled.....Yes".

If not, then go into your TCP/IP properties and enable DHCP or manually configure the client IP settings.

If it is DHCP enabled the "DHCP Server...." field will identify the server it got the address from, try pinging, and connecting to that address via HTTP and HTTPS. If any of those work you probably have multiple devices in router mode on your network, find and remove the rogue.

If the server doesn't answer up then you probably have old info in there. Run "ipconfig /release" to let go of the old DHCP lease, then run "ipconfig /all" to make sure you see an unconfigured interface, finally run "ipconfig /renew" to get a new address, hopefully you will now see usable addresses.

If you are still not working, try configuring your client manually and seeing if you can access the router and everything works, if so your DHCP server may be flaked out. Make sure it is configured correctly and restart it.

Good luck

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How to find the lost IP address of a wireless bridge:

If you have Linux, nmap will solve your problem. nmap will scan all your IP addresses for responding ones.

Suppose you know that the ip address is somewhere around 192.168.13.1 --> 192.168.13.150. But you are not sure which one it is. This will greatly shrink your search space.

Install nmap on the linux

[root@defiant bin]# yum install nmap
   Package 2:nmap-6.01-4.fc17.x86_64 already installed and latest version

Run the nmap command:

nmap -sP 192.168.13.80-140

Understand the above nmap command:

The -sP flag tells nmap to (not search ports) after a host is discovered. The 80-140 token at the end of the ip address means scan for ip addresses 192.168.13.80 through 192.168.13.140.

nmap command produces output:

Starting Nmap 6.01 ( http://nmap.org ) at 2013-08-04 23:12 EDT
Nmap scan report for 192.168.13.84
Host is up (0.00019s latency).
Nmap scan report for 192.168.13.99
Host is up (0.0012s latency).
Nmap scan report for 192.168.13.101
Host is up (0.00063s latency).
Nmap scan report for 192.168.13.104
Host is up (0.040s latency).
Nmap scan report for 192.168.13.108
Host is up (0.00068s latency).
Nmap done: 61 IP addresses (5 hosts up) scanned in 1.66 seconds

Interpret the output:

So what this tells me is that those IP addresses listed were the only ones responding to pings. I can eyeball each one and say, aha, the 192.168.13.101 is my missing wireless bridge. Entering that ip address in a browser brings up the username/login of that router acting as bridge.

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