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I have some music files(.wav). I'd like to burn that onto a CD. I have downloaded the "imgburn" software. I am having trouble figuring out the next steps. Does anybody know the exact steps? There are just so many options to choose from. I want to burn those wav files onto an AUdio CD that can play in my car's CD player.Can I burn those Wav files on a simple CD_R or do I have to have a different kind of disk?

Thanks for the help.

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I love ImgBurn, and use it all the time - but it's not made for creating audio CDs, as I'm sure you've found. Creating an image of an existing disk, sure; writing a billion copies of that image onto disks, yup; writing MP3s onto the disk as MP3s, no problem... but for writing audio CDs, you need some other program. –  MT_Head Jul 28 '13 at 5:27

5 Answers 5

Burn audio CDs the easy way!

Burrrn is a little tool for creating audio CDs with CD-Text from various audio files. Supported formats are: wav, *mp*3, mpc, ogg, aac, mp4, ape, flac, ofr, wv, tta, m3u, pls and fpl playlists and cue sheets. You can also burn EAC’s noncompliant image + cue sheets! Burrrn can read all types of tags from all these formats (including ape tags in mp3). Burrrn uses cdrdao.exe for burning.

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My favourite little audio burner, handles all important formats, and easily throttles the speed (for better quality and compatibility with older CD players, lower writing speeds do indeed have a measurable effect on the quality of the signal burned into a CD-R).

Burrrn is freeware (and easy to make "portable" with Universal Extractor).

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+1. I love how all your answers have nice formatting and a picture. –  RJFalconer Jan 10 '10 at 12:24
    
why, thank you :) –  Molly7244 Jan 10 '10 at 13:46
    
Can we have a citation for "lower writing speeds do indeed have a measurable effect on the quality of the signal burned into a CD-R"? –  Blorgbeard Jan 10 '10 at 20:52
    
you can indeed: soundonsound.com/sos/nov04/articles/qa1104-3.htm –  Molly7244 Jan 10 '10 at 21:05
    
The app is called Burrrn, it's showing a Johnny Cash album... yet for some reason it's an album without Ring of Fire. Opportunity for tasty wordplay, wasted. (Ring of Fire being the only Johnny Cash song I know.) –  skypecakes Jan 16 '10 at 9:12

The software I use is K3B on Ubuntu 9.10

You're likely to be using something different, but it's not a case of burning an image.

K3B calls it 'create an Audio CD'.

As for the media, it depends on your car CD player, but a modern CD player should play an Audio CD you've made with a CD-R.

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Whether your car CD player will play them depends on the player. The stock Bose stereo in my 12 year old car plays burned CDs, but I've had modern rental cars whose CD players would not play them. But it won't be too hard to burn a CD and find out.

A simple CD-R is fine.

I don't think Imgburn can create audio CDs. I think it can only create data CDs, unless it's burning from an .iso image (which you don't have). Try CDBurnerXP, mentioned in this question.

John T.'s suggestion to use the built-in Windows software is also a good one.

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+1 for CD Burner XP (I have added link to your answer), Whilst I feel that IMGburn has a larger feature set, it is more complicated and lacks some of the more basic features. –  William Hilsum Jan 10 '10 at 9:19

Yes, you can use a CD-R.

To burn wav files, there is no additional software needed, right click the files and select Copy to CD or Device:

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Windows Media Player will open and you can click the copy button if there is a CD in the drive.

In the context menu when you right-click the files, you can also use Send To -> CD-RW Drive (choose your CD burner). It will allow you to use the CD burning wizard.

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Won't this burn them as files and not audio tracks? –  RJFalconer Jan 10 '10 at 12:23
    
No. The first method sends them to Windows Media Player, which will burn them as audio. The second option using the Wizard lets you choose between audio CD or data disc. –  John T Jan 10 '10 at 12:32

Add the wav files to your library in Windows Media Player. Then Windows Media Player will be able to burn them to an audio CD. It will give you the right kind of CD (mastered, cda audio type) the first time, and there is no additional software required... this is available out of the box in Windows.

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